0

Emergency Lighting Guide: Emergency Lights

Emergency Light

In last week’s article, we discussed one major part of emergency lighting: Exit signs. In this week’s article, we’ll discuss the second part: Emergency lights. A note before you continue: Try not to confuse the terms “emergency lighting,” an overview of the entire topic, with “emergency lights,” a special light that comes on in the event of an emergency or power failure.

Like exit signs, emergency lights are a complex topic, yet also like exit signs, the regulations dealing with emergency lights come down to the same two important documents: OSHA 29CFR and NFPA 101, also known as the Life Safety Code.

Basic Requirements

The portion of OSHA 29CFR dealing with emergency lights (1910.37(b)) is relatively vague. It simply states, “Each exit route must be adequately lighted so that an employee with normal vision can see along the exit route.” NFPA 101, on the other hand, is much more specific. In section 7.9.2.1, it states:

  • The emergency light must provide illumination for no less than 1-1/2 hours.
  • The initial illumination of the emergency light must be an average of 1 footcandle (10.8 lux).

If you are unfamiliar with footcandles, essentially what the NFPA’s requires is that the light cast on any one square foot of an exit pathway must be equal to one lumen or more (a footcandle is equal to one lumen per square foot). This is something you’ll need to consider when choosing your emergency lights and why many of our lights include photometric charts. An emergency light with typical 5 watt tungsten heads may be appropriate for typical applications, but in many cases, you may need one with Halogen heads or even a special high wattage emergency light.

Testing

NFPA 101 also includes specific language about testing your emergency lights. Section 7.9.3 states:

  • A hard-wired emergency light must be tested monthly for a minimum of 30 seconds.
  • A fully battery-operated emergency light must be tested yearly for a minimum of 1-1/2 hours.

For the sake of convenience, not to mention safety, we highly recommend using self-testing emergency lights. These units continuously monitor the input voltage to the fixture as well as the condition of the battery backup. Should the fixture fail a test, an indicator light will signal that it needs to be serviced. At that point, you can choose whether you need to troubleshoot the input power, replace the emergency light battery, or replace the fixture altogether.

Other Considerations

Items not covered in NFPA 101 but still worth considering include remote capability, emergency ballasts, and aesthetic considerations. Remote capability allows you to connect multiple emergency lights, exit signs, or remote heads together, which will all trigger in the event of an emergency. Emergency ballasts keep fluorescent lights operational in the event of a power failure. Finally, you may want to consider the color and style of the emergency light you choose; after all, it will become a part of your décor.

If you have questions or comments about emergency lighting, be sure to let us know in the comments section. You can also connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus!

Recommended Articles

Lighting Questions, Answered If you follow us on Facebook or Twitter (if you don’t then you definitely should), you’ll know that we wanted to hear your lighting questions. Well, y...
Upgrade Your Car Lights for Maximum Safety Every consumer car, truck, or van comes with lights pre-installed.  Without lights, night driving would be practically impossible and bad-weather traf...
Using Halogens and Light Dimmers as a CFL Alternat... Want to save energy but don’t like CFL light bulbs? You’re not alone. CFLs are among the most efficient, commercially available lighting sources, yet ...
How to Choose Under Cabinet Lights Halogen, Xenon, Fluorescent, or LED: What is the best type of under cabinet lighting? If you've ever asked yourself that question, you were asking the...
Get Creative with Small Spaces: Closet and Pantry ... With Pinterest boards galore dedicated to pictures of gorgeous kitchens, living rooms, and bedrooms, it’s easy to see how smaller areas of the home li...
Sign of the Times: Keeping Your Signs Illuminated ... We've all seen them lurking during nightfall, on the side of the road. It’s the embarrassing display of a poorly lit sign. Sure, there are some buildi...

1000Bulbs.com

Benjamin is a writer for 1000Bulbs.com.