Why Do My Lights Hum?

Jan 05, 15 Why Do My Lights Hum?

Maybe they just have a song in their wires?  In all seriousness, humming or buzzing in your lights can be maddening.  Whether it’s coming from incandescents, fluorescents, or LEDs, the problem usually stems from vibration caused by the voltage applied.  The vibration itself isn’t always the fault of the bulb either, other devices on the same electrical line can lead to noisy lines or noisy light bulbs too.  Usually, this hum is a fairly easy fix so long as you know what to look for, which is great since this is a common problem.

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The Importance of Restaurant Lighting

Oct 15, 14 The Importance of Restaurant Lighting

After a long work week, you’re ready to visit your favorite, cozy and quaint restaurant. The service is pretty good, and the food is exceptional, but your attraction to this place has more to do with the ambiance. After an hour or so here, you completely forget about that stressful thing called a job. With a “switch” in settings, the weekend has officially begun.

Whether you’re going for a casual dinner or a more upscale meal, proper lighting plays a major role in your dining experience.  The lighting in a restaurant affects many elements, including food presentation, mood lighting and overall gratification. 

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How to Choose a Dimmer: Four Factors to Consider

Mar 24, 14 How to Choose a Dimmer: Four Factors to Consider

In past blog entries, we’ve suggested using dimmers to provide mood lighting and save energy, but a lot more goes into choosing a dimmer than you think. Have you ever installed a dimmer only to find that it shortens the life of your bulbs or doesn’t work at all? Chances are you’ve chosen the wrong dimmer for the light sources you’re using or the type of wiring you have in your home.

As nice as it would be to be able to install one dimmer with any lighting system and have it work perfectly, that’s just not the case. There are many types of dimmers, all designed to be compatible with certain light sources and lighting systems. When choosing a dimmer for your lights, here are the important factors you need to consider.

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Easy Ways to Save on Your Electricity Bill

Jan 03, 14 Easy Ways to Save on Your Electricity Bill

Christmas has come and gone, and it’s now the start of a new year. What’s that mean for you? Quitting a habit, like biting your fingernails or finishing other people’s sentences? What about reducing your energy consumption, thus reducing your electric bill? While we support the other goals, reducing your energy consumption sounds a little better. Below are some things that will help you reduce your energy costs in 2014.

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Does Color Temperature Affect Sleep?

Jun 29, 12 Does Color Temperature Affect Sleep?

It’s a long accepted fact that production of the hormone responsible for sleepiness, melatonin, can be suppressed by light. The pineal gland uses the presence of light to determine when to release and suppress the hormone, setting our “internal clock” to a cycle of wakefulness and sleep, also known as a circadian rhythm. Not surprisingly, the large amount of artificial light we encounter in the modern world can have a negative effect on this cycle by suppressing melatonin production even at night. However, recent studies suggest that not just the amount of light, but also the color of the light we encounter may affect our sleep cycles.

A 2005 study conducted by researchers at Kyushu University in Japan suggests that exposure to high color temperature light immediately preceding bedtime reduces the length of stage 4 sleep. In the study, the researchers exposed different subjects to 3000K, 5000K, and 6700K light sources for 6 hours before going to sleep. Researchers monitored the subjects’ sleep patterns and came to this conclusion:

Given that the S4-sleep period is important for sleep quality, our findings suggest that light sources of higher color temperatures may reduce sleep quality compared with those of lower color temperatures.

Other studies by the University of Basel in Switzerland and the University of Connecticut found similar results.

Though these findings are not yet accepted scientific fact, it’s worth noting that manufacturers have already started to create products with these ideas in mind. Philips, for example, produces an entire line of “Wake-Up Lights” that use increasing light intensity and color temperature to wake you from sleep, a method that is marketed as a more natural alternative to alarm clocks. The computer program and smartphone app f.lux reduces the color temperature of screens for less obtrusive nighttime reading. On the flip side, companies have long used “full spectrum” office lighting to increase alertness and productivity, assuming that if high color temperature lighting discourages sleep, it must also encourage wakefulness.

While the scientific community works this all out, what can you do now to improve your sleep? Start with what we do know: Bright light of any color temperature suppresses the production of melatonin, so limit the use of artificial light in the hours preceding sleep. This is easy to do with dimmers, 3-way bulbs, and even low wattage bulbs. Second, conduct your own study: If you currently use high color temperature bulbs and have difficulty sleeping, switch them out for soft white or warm white bulbs and see if you notice a difference.

If you try these ideas out, we’re curious about the results. Does color temperature have any effect on your sleep? Let us know in the comments, or drop us a line on Facebook, Twitter, or Google+.

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