DIY LED Flower Arrangement

Feb 11, 14 DIY LED Flower Arrangement

With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, it’s hard not to think about flowers, ribbons, and fun DIY projects. That’s why we’ve combined all three in this simple, fun tutorial on how to make a beautiful LED Flower Arrangement. Ideal for date nights, weddings, and Sunday crafternoons, this light-up floral arrangement is sure to put a smile on any loved one’s face.




For this tutorial, you will need:
• One real or fake flower (we used a plastic rose)
6 ft. LED Ribbon purchased at 1000Bulbs.com
• Circle of red sheer fabric
• 2-3 sheets of silver tissue paper
• Silver wire for the bow
• Green wire for stems
• Tape
• Wire cutters

Step 1
Create a bow using your LED ribbon. For this example, we did a five-loop bow. This can seem daunting to those that are unfamiliar with making bows. Have no fear, as we show you how to make a pretty and simple bow. What’s great about this ribbon is that it’s dual-sided, wire-edged, lighted, lace-like, and iridescent. It looks nice from both sides, and it is easy to form and hold shapes with. If it takes you a few times to craft a bow and you’re worried about the shape, that’s okay. The ribbon will still look brand new.

Step 2
Tie a knot around the ends of your ribbon and secure it with your green or silver wire.

Step 3
Lay the rose on top of the bow and wrap them together with wire.

Step 4
Take the sheer fabric (it should be in a circle shape with a hole cut out of the middle in an X shape. The X should be about an inch in length) and put the rose through the center. Then fashion the fabric around the stem and the bow.

Step 5
Use clear scotch tape to fasten the LED battery to the bottom stem of the rose. Make sure that the on/off switch is accessible.

Step 6
Wrap your tissue paper around the flower, bow, and fabric and secure everything in place with your ribbon. (Use extra sheets of tissue paper or wire if necessary).

That’s it for this tutorial. Have you done any DIY projects with LED ribbons? Share them in the comments below or tell us about it on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, or Pinterest!

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How to Identify Halogen and Xenon Bi-Pin Bulbs

Jan 11, 13 How to Identify Halogen and Xenon Bi-Pin Bulbs

So one of the bulbs in those little “puck” lights under your kitchen cabinets or the light in your desk lamp has burned out. You may have even had a burn-out with a landscape bullet light. Once you figure out how to get the fixture apart, you find a tiny bulb with two pins you don’t recognize. Now what?

Sure, you can throw the entire fixture out and just get a new one. That may be easier, but it definitely won’t be cheaper. What happens when the bulb burns out again (which it certainly will)? Are you going to just keep buying replacement fixtures?

Relax. We at 1000Bulbs.com have you covered. Identifying and replacing your existing bi-pin xenon bulb (sometimes called ’2-pin bulbs’ or ‘T-bulbs’) is easier than you think. Just follow these five simple steps:

Step 1: Measure the Pin Spacing

How far apart are the pins from each other? You can figure this out by getting a ruler and measuring the space between the pins. The space between the pins is measured in millimeters. Write this measurement down as it will help you find the right base type.

Step 2: Determine the Bulb Voltage

Check the fixture housing or socket and see if there is a label that tells you the voltage of the original bulb. The label will most likely have a UL or CSA symbol. If it’s not on the fixture, try to find it on the bulb itself. When you find the voltage, write it down. If you can’t find the label or the label doesn’t list the voltage, don’t worry. You may still find the correct bulb with some tips coming up in step 4.

Step 3: Check the Pin Type

Now check the pins on your existing bulbs. Are they straight or looped? Most bi-pin bulbs will have straight pins, but there are also bi-pin bulbs that have looped pins. Knowing if the pins are straight or looped will help you to further narrow down your bulb selection. Along with your pin measurements and voltage, make sure to jot down if your pins are looped or straight.

Step 4: Find Your Bulb

Now that you’ve got the bulb spacing, pin type, and (hopefully) voltage, it’s time to find your bulb. If you measured 4 millimeters between pins, that means you have a G4 base bulb, which comes in 6, 12, or 24 volts. If your measurement is just a hair wider than 6 millimeters, you have a bulb with a G6.35 base, which comes in 12, 24, or 120 volts. A measurement of 8 millimeters means you have a G8 base xenon bulb, which only comes in 120 volts. Looped pins spaced 9 millimeters apart means you have a G9 base bulb, which also only comes in 120 volts.

Step 5: Install Your Bulb

After you’ve figured out what bulb you need, installing it is simple. Your fixture has a glass lens that fits over the bulb. After you remove the lens, insert the new bulb into the socket and replace the lens. Be careful not to touch the bulb itself, as the oils on your fingers will damage the bulb, shortening its life and maybe even causing it to melt. Some bulbs come with a wrapping around the bulb to prevent damage when installing them. If your bulb didn’t come with a wrapping, wear gloves or use something to wrap around the bulb, but be sure to remove the wrapping after you install the bulb.

That’s all there is to it. Remember, replacing your bulb is much cheaper than replacing the whole fixture. While replacing the bulb may not be as easy, after a few times, you’ll get the hang of it. If you have any questions about these bulbs or just questions in general, don’t be shy! Drop us a comment in the box below or reach out to us Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus.

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Christmas Mini Lights Buying Guide

Nov 09, 12 Christmas Mini Lights Buying Guide

Walk into any big box store this holiday season and you’ll see two, maybe three, options for Christmas mini lights: Number of bulbs, bulb color, and if you’re lucky, wire color. After all, these are the only choices most people consider.

But “most” people aren’t informed buyers. Any informed buyer craves selection, and that’s why we offer literally hundreds of mini light choices at 1000Bulbs.com.

Of course, with so many choices available, we realize it can be frustrating to find just the right mini lights you need, so to make that process easier, here’s a quick guide to buying mini lights.

Bulb Spacing

Have you ever had to double or triple-wrap a Christmas tree with lights to make it bright enough? The typical set of mini lights has bulb spacing (the amount of wire between individual bulbs) of 12 inches. In almost all cases, that’s too far apart.

The maximum bulb spacing for a Christmas tree, gutter, or house trim should be 6 inches, not 12. To wrap an outdoor tree trunk, pole, or banister, tighter bulb spacing of 4 inches is better. For wreaths, garlands, and other objects with a small diameter, you may even want to go with 2.5 inch spacing.

Wire Gauge

Wire gauge isn’t just a topic for electricians. When it comes to mini lights, the thicker the wire, the longer it lasts and the more end-to-end connections you can make.

The standard wire gauge for mini lights is 22 AWG, but for especially long runs or harsh outdoor conditions, use a thicker wire gauge of 20 or even 18 AWG (the smaller the number, the thicker the gauge).

Lead and Tail Length

Lead length is the distance from the outlet (the male plug) to the first bulb in a set of mini lights. It is typically 3 to 6 inches, but many shorter “craft” lights have longer leads of 2 feet or more.

Longer leads are great for wall-mounted items like wreaths that are usually far away from a wall socket. Having a longer lead means you won’t have lights “floating in space” before they reach their destination.

Tail length is the other end of the string (the female plug) that connects to the next string in the series.

Connection Options

Mentioned earlier in the section on wire gauge, mini lights with a thicker wire gauge are able to handle more end-to-end connections. Though the exact number may vary, most 22 AWG 100 light sets are UL listed for up to three end-to-end (male to female) connections. A 20 AWG set of the same length may be rated for twice that—6 connections. Exceed that recommendation and the fuses within the light string will overload and burn out.

Interestingly, the recommendation for a 50 light set is usually the same. Why? For safety reasons, UL does not recommend more than three end-to-end connections for a 22 AWG string light of any length. If you plan a particularly long run, it is better to use a few 100 or 150 light stands than several shorter strands.

What Are Your Plans?

What are your Christmas lighting plans this year? Let us know what you have in store. Drop us a line in the comments below, or connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus. If you have something especially interesting, we may even pin it on Pinterest!

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Follow 1000Bulbs.com on YouTube

Oct 26, 12 Follow 1000Bulbs.com on YouTube

With nearly 100,000 views, you’ve made the 1000Bulbs.com YouTube channel one of the most popular lighting resources on the web! If you haven’t checked it out recently, here’s what you’re missing:

Product Information Videos

If you’re a fan of 1000Bulbs.com, you’ve noticed we always include any information our manufacturers provide about their product. From instructional guides to specification sheets and brochures, whatever you need is right there on the product page. The same goes for videos like this one from Plumen, which we make sure to include on both our website and our YouTube channel.

Product Tutorials

Have you found a cool product on our site but aren’t sure how to use it? Videos like the one on the Magic Box Christmas Light Tester show you how to use every feature of our product before you buy it!

DIY Videos

In previous articles explaining how to build an antique pendant lamp and last week’s how to build a lighted Halloween ghost, you may have also noticed our videos. There are more where those came from, so make sure to subscribe to our channel and check out our DIY projects page.

Customer Videos

One of the most popular videos on our channel was submitted by a customer. Robert Darwin’s video on how to make a Deadmau5 head using our acrylic globes now has nearly 8,000 views. We’d love to see your videos too, so if you have a video of something you’ve created with our products, let us know!

Be sure to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and Pinterest for even more video updates.

 

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DIY Halloween Ghost Yard Decoration

Oct 19, 12 DIY Halloween Ghost Yard Decoration

Halloween is almost here! If you’re like me, you love being creative and decorating your home. Today, we are going to be talking about making a glowing ghost to haunt the front yard this season! It is super easy to make, inexpensive, and made with things you most likely already have in your house. This crafting idea is fun for the kids as well! You can make your ghost as scary or silly as you’d like!

 

 

Materials to Build Your Ghost

1. Chicken Wire or a Tomato Cage

You’ll need this for the base of the ghost. Tomato cages work best because they require minimal shaping. They come in a variety of sizes and are inexpensive, but if you want to be a little more creative and add more shape to your ghost, then chicken wire is the way to go!

2. An Old Sheet or Piece of Fabric

Typically, you want to use something you would not miss. An old sheet is perfect to use for this project—especially if you want a textured/ripped effect at the bottom of your ghost. You can even use plain fabric of your choice and layer it with sheer fabric for added effects. It’s completely up to you and what look you’re going for!

3. Paint, Fabric, or Paper

There are a wide variety of things you can use for the face of your ghost. Fabric paint is the best method I can recommend. It’s simple, quick, and the kids can help! Not to mention it will last for many Halloweens to come! If you like to sew, you can also take black fabric and cut the eyes and mouth to your sheet. For a quick face without damaging the sheet, painted cardboard or construction paper taped onto the sheet will work just as well.

4. Lights!

For best results, use LED wide angle lightning lights.  The flashing effect of these lights makes your ghost(s) appear then disappear within seconds, making your house even more spooky and fun! The best part about these lights is the fact they’re indestructible and energy efficient! If you don’t have access to these lights, ordinary incandescent or LED mini lights will work as well.

 

Steps to Assemble Your Ghost

Take your base(s) and place wherever needed in the front yard. Keep in mind you may have to run an extension cord, so make sure there are no tripping hazards in the surrounding area. Make sure the base is secured by planting it into the ground.

Take the light strings and begin to wrap it around the base you created. For best results, focus the lights around the head area of your ghost. Think of the lights as a gradient: You want the most concentrated light around the head and have the light fade down the body of the ghost. This will add a spookier, glowing effect, making it look like your ghost is actually floating in your yard!

Once your lights are secured around the base of the ghost, place the “body” (aka sheet) over the base. Turn on your lights, and presto! You have a glowing ghost!

There are many ways to incorporate lighting into your DIY decoration projects. Be sure to check out our Halloween lighting ideas page for more inspiration to decorate your home with this Halloween! Making this for your home? Have your own personal twist to this idea? Share your ideas and photos with us! Drop us a line in comments or on Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus. And if you’re really proud of your creation, be sure to share it on our Pinterest Halloween Pinboard!

 

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