Direct Water Culture (DWC) and You

Aug 25, 14 Direct Water Culture (DWC) and You

So you’ve taken a look at how to set up a drip irrigation system and decided that it’s not for you.  Well the good news is that there are plenty more hydroponics systems for you to experiment with.  So let’s talk about direct water culture (DWC) today.  DWC systems – also known as deep water culture systems – submerge the roots of your plants in a nutrient solution.  This sounds, at first, like a bad idea since you can overwater plants, but that’s where the all-important aeration component comes into play.  Aeration is simply the act of adding oxygen to the water to sustain the roots.  The way you aerate your system defines the type of DWC it is, whether you use a bucket reservoir, prefer bubbleponics, or enjoy a re-circulation system.

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How to Set Up a Drip Irrigation System

Aug 11, 14 How to Set Up a Drip Irrigation System

Let’s talk about drip systems.  With so many hydro systems available, why should you pick a drip system over a nutrient film or ebb and flow system?  Simplicity is one reason.  A drip system is really simple to set up and has been used in outdoor gardens and larger irrigation systems for a long time while film and ebb and flow systems require more careful monitoring and can be tricky to set up properly.  The second reason is water conservation.  When you’re building a hydro system outside, the run-off water can be returned to the soil cycle instead of down the drain like with indoor setups.  A drip system also carefully releases just enough nutrient solution to keep your plants healthy, so there isn’t any wasted water.  Other hydro systems use a lot of constantly flowing water to prevent stagnation.  With a drip system, you can even give specific amounts of nutrients to different types of plants on the same line.  Let me show you how easy it really is to set up a drip system.

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LED Task Lighting Tips

Aug 04, 14 LED Task Lighting Tips

Setting up the right task lighting can be maddening.  Whether you just need to eliminate shadows on your workbench, reduce eyestrain at your desk, or get just the right colors for an art studio, you’ll find different light and setting requirements for each situation.  This is the lighting we use for working on our passions and hobbies, but without proper lighting it’s easier to make mistakes and harder to see the fine details we want to put into our work.  Sometimes it’s the little things, like a minor flaw or a small improvement that can make a huge difference in how we feel about a finished task.  Here’s a quick guide to setting up LED task lighting so you can upgrade to a more cost-effective bulb without losing the quality you’re used to.

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DIY LED Flower Arrangement

Feb 11, 14 DIY LED Flower Arrangement

With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, it’s hard not to think about flowers, ribbons, and fun DIY projects. That’s why we’ve combined all three in this simple, fun tutorial on how to make a beautiful LED Flower Arrangement. Ideal for date nights, weddings, and Sunday crafternoons, this light-up floral arrangement is sure to put a smile on any loved one’s face.

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How to Identify Halogen and Xenon Bi-Pin Bulbs

Jan 11, 13 How to Identify Halogen and Xenon Bi-Pin Bulbs

So one of the bulbs in those little “puck” lights under your kitchen cabinets or the light in your desk lamp has burned out. You may have even had a burn-out with a landscape bullet light. Once you figure out how to get the fixture apart, you find a tiny bulb with two pins you don’t recognize. Now what?

Sure, you can throw the entire fixture out and just get a new one. That may be easier, but it definitely won’t be cheaper. What happens when the bulb burns out again (which it certainly will)? Are you going to just keep buying replacement fixtures?

Relax. We at 1000Bulbs.com have you covered. Identifying and replacing your existing bi-pin xenon bulb (sometimes called ’2-pin bulbs’ or ‘T-bulbs’) is easier than you think. Just follow these five simple steps:

Step 1: Measure the Pin Spacing

How far apart are the pins from each other? You can figure this out by getting a ruler and measuring the space between the pins. The space between the pins is measured in millimeters. Write this measurement down as it will help you find the right base type.

Step 2: Determine the Bulb Voltage

Check the fixture housing or socket and see if there is a label that tells you the voltage of the original bulb. The label will most likely have a UL or CSA symbol. If it’s not on the fixture, try to find it on the bulb itself. When you find the voltage, write it down. If you can’t find the label or the label doesn’t list the voltage, don’t worry. You may still find the correct bulb with some tips coming up in step 4.

Step 3: Check the Pin Type

Now check the pins on your existing bulbs. Are they straight or looped? Most bi-pin bulbs will have straight pins, but there are also bi-pin bulbs that have looped pins. Knowing if the pins are straight or looped will help you to further narrow down your bulb selection. Along with your pin measurements and voltage, make sure to jot down if your pins are looped or straight.

Step 4: Find Your Bulb

Now that you’ve got the bulb spacing, pin type, and (hopefully) voltage, it’s time to find your bulb. If you measured 4 millimeters between pins, that means you have a G4 base bulb, which comes in 6, 12, or 24 volts. If your measurement is just a hair wider than 6 millimeters, you have a bulb with a G6.35 base, which comes in 12, 24, or 120 volts. A measurement of 8 millimeters means you have a G8 base xenon bulb, which only comes in 120 volts. Looped pins spaced 9 millimeters apart means you have a G9 base bulb, which also only comes in 120 volts.

Step 5: Install Your Bulb

After you’ve figured out what bulb you need, installing it is simple. Your fixture has a glass lens that fits over the bulb. After you remove the lens, insert the new bulb into the socket and replace the lens. Be careful not to touch the bulb itself, as the oils on your fingers will damage the bulb, shortening its life and maybe even causing it to melt. Some bulbs come with a wrapping around the bulb to prevent damage when installing them. If your bulb didn’t come with a wrapping, wear gloves or use something to wrap around the bulb, but be sure to remove the wrapping after you install the bulb.

That’s all there is to it. Remember, replacing your bulb is much cheaper than replacing the whole fixture. While replacing the bulb may not be as easy, after a few times, you’ll get the hang of it. If you have any questions about these bulbs or just questions in general, don’t be shy! Drop us a comment in the box below or reach out to us Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus.

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