New Product Enlightenment: LED Candelabra Bulb, Plantmax, and More

Dec 03, 12 New Product Enlightenment: LED Candelabra Bulb, Plantmax, and More

At 1000Bulbs.com, we know we have thousands of products. We also know that you have a life (outside of the Internet) and not a lot of time to go through every product we have online, so say hello to our new series, Enlightenment. Each week, we’ll feature our newest, most innovative products. Sit back, relax, and be enlightened.

PLT 3.5 Watt LED Candelabra Bulb

This energy saving decorative torpedo LED candelabra bulb is perfect for chandeliers and wall lighting and creates a perfect ambiance for any room. It can replace any 25 watt incandescent bulb and has a life expectancy of 30,000 hours. While the incandescent equal is less expensive, it has a life expectancy of only 1,500 hours (FYI, one of these LEDs is the equivalent of 20 incandescent bulbs). Start saving money and energy with our new 3.5 watt decorative torpedo LED candelabra bulb!

Quorum Fixtures

Looking for fun and unique light fixtures? Our newest products from Quorum International feature incredible fixtures with modern, geometric forms. These additions include bathroom fixtures, chandeliers, wall sconces, and more. They bring a stunning elegance with a clean and simple appearance. Give your home a contemporary look with these amazing Quorum International light fixtures!

LEDnovation EnhanceLite LED BR30

LEDnovation’s EnhanceLite LED BR30 is another new, and environmentally friendly, dimmable LED bulb. It is the perfect replacement for a 65 watt incandescent and has a life expectancy of 50,000 hours. It is also UL listed and RoHS compliant. This bulb can be used anywhere warm lighting is needed: Hotel, restaurant, or home – the choice is yours. Just one of these bulbs lasts as long as 25 incandescent bulbs. Be sure to view LEDnovation’s EnhanceLite LED BR30!

Plantmax Grow Lights

Harsh winters keeping you from your horticulture? Not anymore with our Plantmax grow lights! The new collection of Plantmax products includes metal halide bulbs, high pressure sodium bulbs, and ballasts. The metal halide bulbs help the plants grow in vegetative stages, while the high pressure sodium bulbs help in flowering and fruiting. Make sure you and your plants stay happy this winter. Take some time to browse Plantmax grow lights and see which ones are right for you!

eReplacements Projector Lamps

Our new ER series eReplacement front and rear projection lamps are compatible with different brands including 3M, Acer, Mitsubishi, Panasonic, RCA, Samsung, Sony, Toshiba, and many more. All of the lamps have a lifetime of 2,000 hours and a 3 month warranty. Browse through our eReplacement Projector Lamps and find the one best suited to your needs!

7-Gauge RAB Poles

Two of our new RAB 7-gauge drilled steel poles feature a tenon top, while the other has a square cap for pole top. They are all bronze, have a 4-inch shaft, and include an anchor bolt kit with a hand hole cover and a base cover. When used to hold pulse start metal halide flood light fixtures, they’re a great way to keep any large outdoor area lit. Browse through our collection of RAB mounting accessories today!

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LED Christmas Light String Guide

Oct 05, 12 LED Christmas Light String Guide

1000Bulbs.com now carries hundreds of LED Christmas lights. Far from only reserved for the tech-savvy, these products are now mainstream holiday lighting. Last year alone we saw LED Christmas light adoption up 25%, and we expect that trend to continue.

To make your Christmas decorating as easy as possible, here are all the different types of LED Christmas light strings currently available, along with a brief description and application ideas for each type.

LED Mini LightsLED Mini Light Strings: Also known as M5 LED lights, these emulate the look of incandescent mini lights. Most have faceted caps that disperse the light from the LED, though some newer LED mini lights look identical to their incandescent counterparts.

LED Wide Angle LightsLED Wide Angle Mini Lights: Though these do not directly emulate the look of mini lights, they serve the same function. Wide angle LED lights (sometimes called “Polka Dot” lights) use a 5 mm concave lens to disperse light in a wide, circular pattern. See this graphic to better understand how Wide Angle lights work.

LED Versaline LightsLED Commercial Light Sets: New this year, these special low-voltage light sets are meant for commercial applications. Also known by the brand name “Versaline,” these low-voltage lights use proprietary, daisy-chained controllers and connectors for amazing effects in large civic, business, and theme park displays.

LED C6 LightsLED C6 Light Strings: Sometimes called “strawberry” lights, these strings feature 3/4 inch diameter faceted bulbs permanently affixed to wire. Slightly larger and brighter than LED mini lights, C6 strings are popular for indoor applications including garlands and Christmas trees.

LED C7 LightsLED C7 Light Strings: These strings feature 7/8 inch diameter smooth or faceted bulbs permanently affixed to wire. Though typically used outdoors, they are sometimes seen indoors where they create a strong, richly-colored “pop.”

 

LED C9 LightsLED C9 Light Strings: These strings feature 1-1/8 inch diameter smooth or faceted bulbs permanently affixed to wire. Unlike C7 strings, these large, bright bulbs are visible from large distances and are almost exclusively used outdoors to line everything from rooftops to sidewalks.

LED G12 Globe LightsLED G12 “Berry” Light Strings: These strings feature 12 mm (about 1/2 in.) diameter berry-shaped globes permanently affixed to wire. Their unique “berry” shape is sometimes preferred to the cone shape of C6 strings and makes them a popular choice for wreaths and garlands.

 

LED Programmable LightsProgrammable LED Light Strings: Not to be confused with commercial light sets, programmable LED light strings feature built-in, multi-function controllers and large lights in creative shapes like icicles and oversized C7 bulbs. The controllers on these lights are deceptively simple, with just a few buttons able to create a unique light show.

LED InvisiLiteInvisiLite LED Light Strings: Great for centerpieces and small wreaths, these strings feature tiny LED bulbs set on bendable and formable wire that virtually disappears against a green background. The wire is slightly rigid, so it holds its shape and affixes well to any type of artificial greenery.

 

What is your choice for Christmas lights this year? Will you be using LED or sticking with old-fashioned incandescent? Let us know what you think in the comments, and be sure to share your project ideas on our Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and Pinterest pages. We especially like to see your pictures!

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4 Steps to Clean Up a Broken CFL

Sep 07, 12 4 Steps to Clean Up a Broken CFL

If you read last week’s article, you learned about the mercury content in compact fluorescents and just how much of a threat it can be to your health. However, you were probably left with this question: If a CFL in your home breaks, what do you do? You don’t need to call a hazmat team, but you will need to follow these 4 tips for your safety:

1. Don’t Panic

First, don’t panic. As noted in the previous article, your exposure to mercury from a broken CFL is less than that in a tuna sandwich. Though the danger of mercury exposure is minimal, use common sense: Get everyone out of the room and make sure they don’t step on the glass.

2. Close Off the Room

Next, close off the room and open the windows to let any mercury vapors ventilate. It’s also a good idea to turn off your HVAC system to avoid circulating the vapors throughout your home. The room should be safe to re-enter after about 10 minutes*.

3. Collect the Debris

Upon returning to the room, collect the debris, including broken glass, powder, and plastic from the broken lamp. Do this by scooping up the broken pieces with a stiff piece of paper. Use the sticky side of a piece of duct tape to pick up any smaller pieces remaining on the floor or stuck in carpet fibers. However, do not use a vacuum cleaner, which could excite the mercury on the floor and release it into the air.

4. Recycle or Dispose

Finally, place all materials in a sealable container such as a jar or pack it within two zipper bags. Dispose of the CFL and its container according to laws in your area. Though most areas allow CFLs to be disposed of in the garbage, the best way to dispose of a CFL, broken or intact, is by recycling. The process is simple, inexpensive, and in some areas, it’s even free. To find a recycling location near you, go to Earth911.com. For added convenience, you may prefer a postage-paid CFL recycling kit from Veolia.

Have you ever had to clean up a broken CFL? Let us know and share your thoughts in the comments below, or visit us on Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus!

*As recommended by the US EPA. Smaller or poorly ventilated rooms should be left unoccupied for a longer period of time.

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Mercury in CFL Bulbs: Is It Dangerous?

Aug 31, 12 Mercury in CFL Bulbs: Is It Dangerous?

Lighting topics don’t get much more exciting than the debate over the mercury content of compact fluorescents (CFLs). Those against the use of CFLs claim that the potential harm of toxic mercury contained within the energy-saving bulbs far outweighs any environmental benefits. On the other side, groups feel such rhetoric is overblown. But what are the facts?

 

Why Use Mercury in CFLs?

Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element used in applications as varied as thermometers, dental fillings, and fluorescent lighting. The cathodes within a fluorescent tube produce electric current that passes through argon gas and mercury vapor. In turn, the mercury vapor emits ultraviolet light that excites the phosphor coating within the fluorescent tube, producing visible light [1]. The technology is the same for both linear fluorescent tubes (like those seen in office buildings) and self-ballasted compact fluorescents (the “spiral” bulbs used in homes). In short, without mercury, fluorescent lights will not work.

 

How Much Mercury is in a CFL?

The amount of mercury contained within a CFL varies, and in general, has decreased since their introduction nearly two decades ago. As of November 2010, the US EPA’s Energy Star program concluded that the average amount of mercury within a screw-in CFL was 4 milligrams, comparable to the size of a ballpoint pen tip [2]. This pales in comparison to older thermometers, which contain as much as 500 mg [3] and even amalgam dental fillings, which contain about 100 mg of mercury [4].

Mercury Content

Mercury Content in Popular Items

Keep in mind, however, that the mercury contained in a CFL, thermometer, or dental filling can be present in these sources in two forms: A liquid, which is what we typically think of when we think of mercury, and a vapor that quickly dissipates. In the case of a broken CFL, the most likely form of exposure comes from inhaled mercury vapor. A paper in the August 2009 issue of the lighting journal LD+A found that the median amount of mercury vapor to which a person is exposed through a broken CFL is a tiny fraction of the total mercury contained within the bulb: Approximately 0.07 micrograms (0.0007 mg). On the other hand, a tuna fish sandwich, which contains the more hazardous methylmercury, is estimated to expose the consumer to more than 48 times that amount due to the more efficient method of consumption (literally eating the mercury) [5].

 

Who Regulates Mercury in CFLs?

Despite its relatively low concentration in CFLs, mercury is still a toxic substance. For this reason, the EPA requires that CFLs contain no more than 5 mg of mercury for consideration in their Energy Star program. The European Union and the State of California adopted even tougher regulations, requiring CFLs to contain no more than 2.5 mg of mercury by 2013 [6]. Manufacturers, however, have made the biggest strides. A 60-watt equal, warm white Neolite CFL by Litetronics, for example, uses only 1 mg of mercury, 80% less than Energy Star requirements [7]. Along with other major manufacturers, Sylvania voluntarily capped CFL mercury content at 4 mg, with the 13-watt DULUX EL 29409 containing only 1.5 mg [8].

 

The Answer?

So the question remains: Is the mercury in CFLs dangerous? It’s not an easy question to answer. Mercury is a toxic substance, yet it is unlikely that fluorescent lighting would ever expose a person to an amount of the neurotoxin sufficient to cause physiological harm. Want proof of that? Despite putting themselves in a worst-case scenario fluorescent lighting mishap, to the best of our knowledge, these two guys are still alive and well:

 

References:

1. Van Dussen, Matthew. ‘The Mercury Myth: How Much Mercury Do CFLs Actually Contain?’ TXNOLOGIST. Retrieved 2012-08-30.

2. ‘Frequently Asked Questions: Information on Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs (CFLs) and Mercury’. Energy Star. Retrieved 2012-08-30.

3. ‘Indoor Liquid Mercury Spills: Frequently Asked Questions’. State of Michigan. Retrieved 2012-08-30.

4. ‘IMERC Fact Sheet: Mercury Use in Dental Amalgam’. NEWMOA. Retrieved 2012-08-30.

5. Clear, Robert et al. ‘Dangerous Mercury in CFLs? One Big Fish Story’. LD+A. Retrieved 2012-08-30.

6. (2)

7. Litetronics Neolite Sell Sheet. 1000Bulbs.com. Retrieved 2012-08-30.

8. ‘Mercury Quantity in Lamps for General Lighting Applications’. Sylvania. Retrieved 2012-08-30.

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Energy-Saving Light Bulbs (Video)

Today’s article takes a slightly different approach than usual. One of the questions we often get here on the blog and in our Wednesday Lighting Q&A on Facebook is about energy-saving bulbs. Specifically, people want to know what defines an energy-saving light bulb and what makes an LED better than a CFL, a CFL better than a Halogen, or any variant on that question.

With that in mind, we’ve recorded a short, introductory video that we hope will answer most of your questions. Of course, we’ll gladly answer any remaining questions you may have in the comments section below, on our Facebook page, or on our Twitter or Google Plus accounts. You can also check out our related Squidoo article, also titled “Energy-Saving Light Bulbs.”

So grab some popcorn and sit back! (Assuming that’s OK with your boss)

 

 

[TRANSCRIPT]

Welcome to 1000Bulbs.com, the Internet’s number one retailer of light bulbs and lighting products. In today’s video, we’ll be discussing a very popular but often misunderstood topic: Energy-saving light bulbs.

“Energy-saving” is a term thrown around pretty often these days, especially referring to light bulbs. But just what is an energy-saving light bulb? Though there is no strict definition of an energy-saving bulb, one thing is certain: It must be more efficient than an incandescent bulb. That said, energy-saving bulbs fall into one of three product types: Halogen light bulbs, compact fluorescents (more commonly known as “CFLs”), and light-emitting diodes, better known simply as “LEDs.” Let’s look at each bulb type one-by-one to understand their benefits.

First, for reference, we have incandescent light bulbs. Though they’re old technology, they’re still very common. On the plus side, incandescent light bulbs are inexpensive and completely dimmable. However, these attributes are overshadowed by how inefficient they are as well as their short lifespan.

Next, we have the first of our energy savers, the Halogen light bulb. You’ll notice that these look very similar to incandescent bulbs. Also like incandescent bulbs, Halogen bulbs are inexpensive and dimmable. However, Halogens only last about 1,000 hours, and they’re only 15 to 20 percent more efficient than incandescent bulbs.

Now we have the compact fluorescent, which is probably what you think of when you hear about energy-saving bulbs. CFLs have many positive attributes, including being relatively inexpensive, at least in comparison to LEDs, as well as lasting eight times longer than an incandescent or Halogen and using about 80% less energy than an incandescent bulb. Unfortunately, most compact fluorescents are non-dimmable. They also contain a small amount of toxic mercury, so they have to be recycled, and some people find their characteristic spiral shape off-putting.

Finally, we can discuss LED light bulbs. Not only are these the most efficient light bulbs available to homeowners, they last 50,000 hours or more, and most models are fully dimmable. Of course, anything has drawbacks, including LED. These bulbs are an emerging technology, so manufacturers are still working out some of their “kinks.” Also, as a new technology, LEDs are still relatively expensive, though their prices are dropping rapidly as technology improves.

So let’s look at these four bulbs side-by-side: An incandescent bulb produces 13.3 lumens–the standard measurement of light output–for each watt of energy used. A Halogen light bulb is only slightly more efficient, producing 16 lumens per watt. Compact fluorescents, however, make a huge leap in efficiency, producing 61.5 lumens per watt. But by far the most efficient is LED, which produces nearly 90 lumens per watt!

To learn more, be sure to visit 1000Bulbs.com!

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