Get Your LED Christmas Lights Early!

Jul 20, 12 Get Your LED Christmas Lights Early!

It’s that time of year again: Christmas in July. Not only does this magical season give you the opportunity to buy discounted inventory, it also allows you the best chance to secure 2012′s “latest and greatest” high-tech Christmas lights and decorations. You don’t want to be the only home on the block without them, do you? These products move fast, so if you pick up only one or two light strings, there’s no guarantee you’ll be able to get a larger quantity of matching lights when you need them later in the year.

Buying matching lights is essential since mixing lights from two or more manufacturers inevitably leads to color and performance discrepancies, especially among LED Christmas lights. If you aren’t careful, come October or November you could be stuck with a collection of off-colored, flickering light strings with irregular spacing and a phone book’s worth of manufacturer names. In the 2011 Christmas season, 25% more of our customers chose LED over traditional incandescent Christmas lights, when compared to the 2010 season. That’s the most rapid adoption of any technology we’ve seen, and it’s especially amazing considering traditional incandescent lights outnumbered our LEDs last year two to one. We project even bigger LED adoption this year, so if you don’t want to find yourself in the scenario described above, buy early and in bulk.

The increasing adoption of LED Christmas lights means we’re putting special emphasis on LED quality this year. Our buyers have traveled to trade shows and lighting fairs around the country to hand-pick the best Christmas lights available. Not all LEDs are created equal, so we only bring in the LED lights that do best in demonstrations and that manufacturers test for longevity. In some cases, we’ve even had lights manufactured to our custom specifications!

If you’re still skeptical about LED technology, consider this: A recent poll on our Facebook page shows that while some customers are still waiting to switch, early adopters of LED lights are overwhelmingly satisfied with them. Since LED technology becomes more efficient and less expensive every year, you can bet our 2012 selection will meet your expectations. If you’re still wondering just what LEDs can do for you, watch our Christmas YouTube videos to see some of the infinite possibilities of LED Christmas lights.

If you transition to LED lights this year, you’ll have a partner every step of the way in 1000Bulbs.com. Industry-leading professionals have trained our sales staff to assist customers with large orders, ensuring the products you buy are compatible with each other and guiding customers in the setup of more intricate systems. If you have a question down the road, our customer service team can answer questions and aid in troubleshooting. Rest assured we will do everything possible to ensure you have the best lighting display possible this Christmas!

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CFL Warm-Up Times: 4 Bulbs Put to the Test

Jul 13, 12 CFL Warm-Up Times: 4 Bulbs Put to the Test

You know the feeling. You just came home from the hardware store with a blister pack of brand new, energy-saving CFLs. You screw them in and hit the switch. “Oh, this is gonna be good,” you say to yourself. You’re going to save tons of money and your bulbs are gonna look great! Then you notice they’re dim, really dim. Defeated, you retreat to another room to find your receipt. But then, when you return a minute or so later, they’re as bright as you expected them to be! What sorcery is this?

Everyone has had this experience with their first batch of CFLs, though maybe it wasn’t as melodramatic. To understand why compact fluorescents start off dim, you have to know a bit about how fluorescent lighting works. Unlike an incandescent bulb, which creates light by heating a filament until it is white-hot, fluorescent lights use cathodes to heat a special gas or mix of gases to create UV light. The UV light is then filtered through phosphors to create white or colored light. To do this however, the cathodes have to warm up.

The Setup

Every new CFL on the market uses different proprietary technology to shorten the bulb’s warm-up time, with varied results, so we chose to test four of our best-selling 60 watt CFLs. Though this is far from a scientific study, here’s how we conducted the experiment: We screwed each bulb into a lamp, and set a light meter about one foot to the side the lamp. We propped up the light meter so it was roughly on the same horizontal plane as the CFL’s midpoint. We then turned on each bulb and used the light meter to record the maximum light output of the bulb. Finally, we replaced the bulbs with identical bulbs of the same make and model (using the already warm bulb would have skewed our results). We then switched the bulbs on and recorded the time it took to meet the previously recorded maximum output.

Bulb One: Energy Miser

The first bulb we tested is a 13 watt, 2700K CFL from Energy Miser. Just over $1.00 each, this bulb is not only the most inexpensive of the bulbs we tested, but it’s also our best seller. The manufacturer doesn’t make any claims about the bulb’s warm up time, though our customers have given it an average 5-star rating. In our tests, the bulb reached its maximum output in 2 minutes, 2 seconds. That’s not exactly quick, but according to most manufacturers, it’s about on par for a typical CFL.

Bulb Two: TCP TruStart

The second bulb we tested, a TCP TruStart, is a fairly new addition to our product line. In their spec sheet, TCP claims this bulb is the “Best on/off CFL ever made!” Unlike the previous bulb we tested, TCP does make a claim about this bulb’s warm-up time; specifically, TCP says the CFL has a less than 30 second warm-up time. Our tests showed this claim to be mostly true, with the bulb reaching its full brightness at 38.7 seconds.

Bulb Three: Sylvania DULUX EL

The third bulb we tested is from the “big three” of lighting manufacturers, Sylvania. Sylvania also doesn’t make any specific claims about warm-up times for this 13 watt CFL from their DULUX EL family, nor do our customers (who give it an average 4-star rating). So how did this name brand product fare? Pretty well, it turns out. The bulb reached its full brightness at 1 minute, 7 seconds. That not as good as the TCP TruStart, but it’s nearly twice as fast as the Energy Miser.

Bulb Four: TCP InstaBright

The final bulb we tested is a little different from the other four we tested. This covered CFL from TCP has a glass cap over the fluorescent spiral tube so that it looks more like a typical A-shape incandescent bulb. In their InstaBright G2 brochure, TCP claims the bulb has the “Fastest run-up time and significantly improved light build up time,” and it is supposed to reach full brightness in 45 seconds. Surprisingly, this bulb beat even its own estimates, reaching full brightness in only 35.1 seconds!

Which of these bulbs should you buy? It depends how much you’re willing to pay and how much you value fast warm-up times. There is a spread of more than $4.00 between the cheapest and most expensive of these bulbs. Is a few seconds quicker to reach full brightness worth the premium? Let us know what you think in the comments, or connect with us on Facebook, Google+, and Twitter.

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New Product Spotlight: TCP LED BR Reflector Bulbs

Jun 15, 12 New Product Spotlight: TCP LED BR Reflector Bulbs

If you’ve read this blog before, you know one of the shortcomings of LED lighting is that LEDs, by nature, project light forward. Manufacturers have posed all kinds of creative solutions to this problem, from frosted caps to space station looking spires of LEDs within the bulb envelope. However, one of our favorite brands here at 1000Bulbs.com claims to have solved this problem, at least for reflector bulbs, with a surprisingly simple solution.

The LED reflector light bulb market is saturated with Halogen PAR clones. PAR lamps, which are a directional light source anyway, are an obvious format for LED. The PAR format allows LEDs to show off their energy saving potential without addressing the directional problem of LEDs. As a result, LED bulbs such as the MSi iPAR38 have been a big hit, especially with businesses, but not so much with homeowners who prefer the shape of traditional incandescent BR- and R-type bulbs.

TCP took this challenge to heart when they created their new line of BR LED bulbs. The “guts” of the incandescent-inspired bulbs are the same as an LED PAR lamp, but the face is capped with a round, frosted lens to refract the light coming from the LEDs. This refraction creates a softer beam spread more similar to that of incandescent bulbs. Plus, when used in recessed cans, the bulbs look just like the incandescents they replace.

The light quality of the bulbs is equally impressive. The BR LED line has a CRI (Color Rendering Index) of 85, higher than the usual 80-82 of most LED bulbs. The dimming quality is great, too. TCP has manufactured the bulbs to be dimmable down to 0.5%, and our tests show them to be compatible with both analog and electronic dimmers, which until now, we had never seen on an LED bulb.

TCP’s new line of LED reflector light bulbs includes BR40, BR30, and R20 LED bulbs, available in 2400K and 2700K versions. The BR40 and BR30 can replace 65 watt and 85 watt incandescent bulbs, respectively. The R20 replaces a 50 watt incandescent. All the bulbs are rated for 25,000 hours and carry a 5-year manufacturer warranty. The mercury-free LED bulbs save approximately 80% of the energy used by similar Halogen bulbs.

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Do Yellow Bug Light Bulbs Work?

Jun 08, 12 Do Yellow Bug Light Bulbs Work?

Ah…summertime. Warm weather, pool parties, barbecues, and bugs. Lots and lots of bugs. Few things can turn a summer day into utter misery faster than a swarm of flying insects. You’ve tried greasy bug spray, citronella candles, Tiki torches, maybe even blowtorches. So we can imagine your surprise when you saw a yellow-colored “bug light bulb” at your local hardware store. Could it be true? Could screwing in a light bulb solve your bug problems for good?

To answer that question, let’s start by clearing up some myths about yellow incandescent bug lights and their energy-saving cousin, compact fluorescent bug lights. Bug lights do not kill bugs (you’ll need a bug zapper or Paraclipse fly trap for that), nor do bug lights repel bugs. Bug lights simply attract fewer bugs than other light bulbs. In short, a bug light will not magically solve your bug problem, but it will make you and your home less visible to most flying insects.

As discussed in a past article, light is divided into multiple wavelengths, measured in nanometers (nm), as you can see in the graph below. The human eye can only perceive a small band of wavelengths in the light spectrum, from about 390 to 750 nm. Insects perceive a similarly small band of the light spectrum, though their band of vision is shifted further to the “right” of the spectrum than ours. In fact, any wavelength higher than about 650 nm is virtually invisible to most flying insects.

Visible Light Spectrum

Image courtesy of Chemistryland.com

So why are bug lights yellow? Wavelength and color temperature have an inverse relationship, which you can also see in the graph. As the wavelength of a light source decreases, its color temperature increases (as according to Wien’s displacement law). Low color temperatures are red-yellow and exhibit a long wavelength, while high color temperatures are blue-violet and exhibit a short wavelength. By coloring a bulb yellow, then, the manufacturer has decreased the color temperature and in doing so increased the wavelength into a spectrum unseen by insects.

That’s the science of how bug light lights work, but the larger question is whether they are effective. From personal experience, I can say yes, they are. However, bug lights are not a panacea for all your bug problems. This is for a couple reasons. One is that not all insects are the same; different bugs see slightly different wavelengths. Second, no light source is made up of one, pure wavelength. Even an apparently yellow light may exhibit some shorter (and bluer) wavelengths that insects may still see.

To get the most out of your bug light, remember this: The bugs aren’t there because they like the light; they’re there because they like the smaller (and tastier) bugs that buzz around the light. If these smaller bugs sense any light whatsoever, it won’t be long before they buzz their way to bask in it. And once the small bugs are there, it won’t be long before the bigger bugs follow. Once that happens, you have a bug party on your hands, light or no light. The best thing to do to avoid a swarm of bugs is to turn the light off when you don’t need it.

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The Lighting Facts Label Explained

May 18, 12 The Lighting Facts Label Explained

If you’re like me, you ignore the Nutrition Facts label on your food. I know I should be reading it, but a serving of Pringles is only 16 chips? Please! I eat that in 20 seconds. Of course, I might change my habits if there was some sort of monetary compensation for eating better.

There is no such promise with the Nutrition Facts label. However, there is immediate compensation in energy savings when you follow the LED Lighting Facts label published by the US Department of Energy or the Lighting Facts Label published by the Federal Trade Commission. These innovative labels appear on the packaging of all light bulbs manufactured since January of this year.

The Difference Between the DOE and the FTC Label

The biggest difference between the DOE LED Lighting Facts Label and the FTC Lighting Facts Label is right there in the title. The DOE label is only for LED lighting. The FTC label, on the other hand, applies to any bulb with a medium screw base manufactured after January 2012; this includes incandescent bulbs, Halogen bulbs, CFL bulbs, and LED bulbs that do not already have a DOE label.

Another difference is that the FTC label is mandatory, while the DOE label is voluntary. Also, the DOE label is independently verified, while the FTC label contains data solely from the manufacturer. The DOE’s independent testing, combined with more detailed information, can make it more helpful to retailers, lighting designers, and contractors who need specific lighting data for their clients. The FTC label, on the other hand, contains only the information useful to the typical homeowner.

The following table shows a side-by-side comparison of the data presented in the DOE and FTC labels:

DOE LED Lighting Facts FTC Lighting Facts
Brightness (Lumens) Yes Yes
Color Temperature Yes Yes
Energy Used (Watts) Yes Yes
Efficacy (Lm/W) Yes No
Lifetime No Yes
Estimated Energy Cost No Yes
Color Accuracy (CRI) Yes No
Mercury Content No Yes

What the Labels Don’t Include

Some of the specifications left out on one or the other label may surprise you. The FTC label, for example, does not include figures for efficacy (the ratio of light output to energy use) or color accuracy. To most homeowners, however, those specs aren’t too important. The missing specs in the DOE label are more notable. The DOE label doesn’t include lifetime, estimated energy cost, or mercury content. Each of these, however, is left out with good reason. Lifetime is left out because, as of now, there is no standard for testing the lifetime of an LED bulb. Estimated energy cost is not included because of the label’s focus on commercial applications, in which lighting designers will need to perform more specific calculations. Finally, the DOE label does not include a statement of mercury content because LEDs do not contain mercury.

Where to Find More Information

This helpful brochure from the US Department of Energy explains the LED Lighting Facts label in more detail, while this article compares the DOE and FTC labels. If there are other specifics you would like us to cover, be sure to leave a comment below or contact us on Facebook, Twitter, or Google+.

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