Follow 1000Bulbs.com on YouTube

Oct 26, 12 Follow 1000Bulbs.com on YouTube

With nearly 100,000 views, you’ve made the 1000Bulbs.com YouTube channel one of the most popular lighting resources on the web! If you haven’t checked it out recently, here’s what you’re missing:

Product Information Videos

If you’re a fan of 1000Bulbs.com, you’ve noticed we always include any information our manufacturers provide about their product. From instructional guides to specification sheets and brochures, whatever you need is right there on the product page. The same goes for videos like this one from Plumen, which we make sure to include on both our website and our YouTube channel.

Product Tutorials

Have you found a cool product on our site but aren’t sure how to use it? Videos like the one on the Magic Box Christmas Light Tester show you how to use every feature of our product before you buy it!

DIY Videos

In previous articles explaining how to build an antique pendant lamp and last week’s how to build a lighted Halloween ghost, you may have also noticed our videos. There are more where those came from, so make sure to subscribe to our channel and check out our DIY projects page.

Customer Videos

One of the most popular videos on our channel was submitted by a customer. Robert Darwin’s video on how to make a Deadmau5 head using our acrylic globes now has nearly 8,000 views. We’d love to see your videos too, so if you have a video of something you’ve created with our products, let us know!

Be sure to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and Pinterest for even more video updates.

 

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DIY Halloween Ghost Yard Decoration

Oct 19, 12 DIY Halloween Ghost Yard Decoration

Halloween is almost here! If you’re like me, you love being creative and decorating your home. Today, we are going to be talking about making a glowing ghost to haunt the front yard this season! It is super easy to make, inexpensive, and made with things you most likely already have in your house. This crafting idea is fun for the kids as well! You can make your ghost as scary or silly as you’d like!

 

 

Materials to Build Your Ghost

1. Chicken Wire or a Tomato Cage

You’ll need this for the base of the ghost. Tomato cages work best because they require minimal shaping. They come in a variety of sizes and are inexpensive, but if you want to be a little more creative and add more shape to your ghost, then chicken wire is the way to go!

2. An Old Sheet or Piece of Fabric

Typically, you want to use something you would not miss. An old sheet is perfect to use for this project—especially if you want a textured/ripped effect at the bottom of your ghost. You can even use plain fabric of your choice and layer it with sheer fabric for added effects. It’s completely up to you and what look you’re going for!

3. Paint, Fabric, or Paper

There are a wide variety of things you can use for the face of your ghost. Fabric paint is the best method I can recommend. It’s simple, quick, and the kids can help! Not to mention it will last for many Halloweens to come! If you like to sew, you can also take black fabric and cut the eyes and mouth to your sheet. For a quick face without damaging the sheet, painted cardboard or construction paper taped onto the sheet will work just as well.

4. Lights!

For best results, use LED wide angle lightning lights.  The flashing effect of these lights makes your ghost(s) appear then disappear within seconds, making your house even more spooky and fun! The best part about these lights is the fact they’re indestructible and energy efficient! If you don’t have access to these lights, ordinary incandescent or LED mini lights will work as well.

 

Steps to Assemble Your Ghost

Take your base(s) and place wherever needed in the front yard. Keep in mind you may have to run an extension cord, so make sure there are no tripping hazards in the surrounding area. Make sure the base is secured by planting it into the ground.

Take the light strings and begin to wrap it around the base you created. For best results, focus the lights around the head area of your ghost. Think of the lights as a gradient: You want the most concentrated light around the head and have the light fade down the body of the ghost. This will add a spookier, glowing effect, making it look like your ghost is actually floating in your yard!

Once your lights are secured around the base of the ghost, place the “body” (aka sheet) over the base. Turn on your lights, and presto! You have a glowing ghost!

There are many ways to incorporate lighting into your DIY decoration projects. Be sure to check out our Halloween lighting ideas page for more inspiration to decorate your home with this Halloween! Making this for your home? Have your own personal twist to this idea? Share your ideas and photos with us! Drop us a line in comments or on Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus. And if you’re really proud of your creation, be sure to share it on our Pinterest Halloween Pinboard!

 

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How to Pick a Christmas Tree

Oct 12, 12 How to Pick a Christmas Tree

Buying a Christmas tree, to many, is a yearly ritual of taking the family to a tree lot and buying a fresh, newly cut evergreen tree. For the more practical, it’s an ever-so-often trip to a store ending in “mart” to buy an artificial tree. There is always a conflict between aesthetics and practicality when it comes to buying a tree. What if you could select an artificial Christmas tree so realistic you would swear it even smelled like a real tree? What if it was also so well constructed you could pass it down for generations?

With today’s designer Christmas trees, like those from Barcana, that’s possible. Hardy branches, lifetime warranties, and quick setup are common to every tree we carry at 1000Bulbs.com. Though quality and durability are a given no matter which of our trees you choose, after you pick the size and the “species” of your tree, you have one decision left, whether to go with PVC or PE branches. Both are great options, but one or the other may be a better fit for your home or business.

The most common type of Christmas tree is made of polyvinyl chloride, more commonly known as PVC. At 1000Bulbs.com, we call these “classic” trees because they’re made of the material used to build Christmas trees for the past several decades. The manufacturing process is simple: Thin sheets of flexible PVC are cut into long, flat strips and then attached to a twisted wire shaft. Production of PVC trees is inexpensive, so savings that are passed to you, the customer. Though they aren’t the most exquisite option available, PVC Christmas trees are better constructed than they used to be, making them a good option for any homeowner on a budget.

Despite quality improvements, however, PVC trees barely compare to polyethylene, or PE, trees. Premium quality, ultra realistic PE Christmas trees are produced with the interior designer in mind. Their branches are injection molded and three-dimensional. Because the molds are created from real evergreen needles, PE branches are almost indistinguishable from the real thing. Though PE trees were once quite expensive, their price is now more in line with PVC trees, making them an option for homeowners as well as professional designers.

What both types of trees have in common is easy setup. If you remember tree setup taking an hour or more, you’ll be shocked to find out how quickly and easily you can set up a designer Christmas tree. If you don’t believe us, you can see for yourself in this Christmas tree setup video, where we set up a designer tree in less than 10 minutes! PE trees especially are almost “ready to go” right out of the box. The branches hold their shape well, even in storage, so they need very little “fluffing” and adjusting. Many models are even pre-lit with incandescent or LED lights. Whichever type you choose, you won’t be disappointed.

What kind of Christmas tree are you setting up this year? Let us know in the comments or drop up a line on Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus. We’d especially like to see your holiday decoration photos on Pinterest!

And one more thing: We’re giving away one of our designer Christmas trees on Facebook. Click here to enter!

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How to Choose Under Cabinet Lights

Sep 28, 12 How to Choose Under Cabinet Lights

Halogen, Xenon, Fluorescent, or LED: What is the best type of under cabinet lighting? If you’ve ever asked yourself that question, you were asking the wrong question. There is no “good, better, best” with under cabinet lights. Choosing the right light is a matter of personal preference, and it depends on how much you value dimming, heat reduction, color accuracy, and energy savings.

Xenon Light Bulb

Xenon Light Bulb

Xenon under cabinet lights are an update of older Halogen lights. Halogen under cabinet lights, especially the light “pucks” you see in hardware stores, are cheap and provide perfect color accuracy (color rendering index), but they use tons of energy and waste most of it as heat. Xenon keeps the benefits of Halogen, but burns brighter and cooler. Their color rendering makes granite countertops or trinkets in display cabinets look their absolute best, and because they are brighter than Halogens, Xenon bulbs save energy by using fewer watts than a Halogen bulb.

Fluorescent under cabinet lights are a great choice for bright, energy-efficient lighting that burns cool. They’re a popular choice in kitchen cabinets and pantries because they don’t add extra heat to their surroundings, which can increase the likelihood of food spoilage. Unfortunately, there are a number of trade-offs. Fluorescent lights have relatively poor color rendering — 80 CRI to Xenon’s 100 CRI — so they distort colors and make granite and marble countertops and backsplashes appear washed out. Furthermore, while they use much less energy than Halogen or even Xenon, they are not dimmable and some models are slow to reach full brightness.

LED Under Cabinet Light Bar

LED Under Cabinet Light

LED is the newest, most energy saving option for under cabinet lighting. To many, LED under cabinet lights are the perfect option. Unlike fluorescent, they are instant on and many models are dimmable. Unlike Halogen and Xenon, they also create very little heat. However, they do have two drawbacks: Color rendering and cost. Like fluorescent lights, their CRI is in the 80-90 range, so they aren’t the best choice when color accuracy is highly valued. They also have the highest up-front cost of any under cabinet choice. On the other hand, they will save the most in the long-term. LEDs use only a fraction of the energy consumed by other types of under cabinet lights. Even better, they last 20,000 to 60,000 hours,  so you’ll never have to replace them and will save on bulb replacement costs.

Again, your choice of under cabinet lights will depend on your specific needs. In general, however, if you prize color accuracy and don’t mind the heat, choose Xenon, but if you prefer energy savings and cool operation, go with fluorescent or LED. Of course, that’s only what we think. Let us know which under cabinet lighting option you prefer in the comments, or drop us a line on Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus.

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How to Build an Antique Fixture for Under $25

Mar 30, 12 How to Build an Antique Fixture for Under $25

As we’ve discussed in an earlier articleAntique light bulbs and antique light fixtures have become increasingly popular in recent years. Whether it’s nostalgia or just an honest affinity for ornate blown glass and intricately looped glowing filaments, restaurants, upscale retail shops, and even homeowners can’t get enough of antique lighting.

Unfortunately, high demand leads to inflated prices. Any simple fixture that claims to be “antique” or “vintage” costs a premium. Some are worth the price, but we’ve seen simple antique pendants out there going for over $100, when the raw materials to build the fixture cost under $25. These are certainly nice products, but are they worth the markup?

The following guide will show you how to build your own antique swag light fixture in less than 10 minutes with materials you can buy for about $25, including the bulb.

Needed Materials:

(1) antique twisted wire cord - $6.00
(1) dimming brass socket - $10.00
(1) EZ grip antique plug - $1.50
(1) antique light bulb - $5.00

Needed Tools:

A flat head screwdriver
A set of wire strippers
A pair of scissors

Step 1: Prepare the Wire

Prepared Wires

Prepared Wires

Using wire strippers, strip the PVC jacket of both wires on both ends of the cord, exposing about 1/2 inch of the inner copper strands. Trim back the cloth covering another 1/2 inch, using scissors to cut away any frayed threads.

Step 2: Attach the Socket

Attaching Socket Terminals

Attaching Socket Terminals

Pop the socket cap off the socket shell. Feed one end of the cord through the top of the socket cap. At this point, tie the wires into an Underwriter’s Knot to relieve excess strain. Using the screwdriver, attach the wires to the terminals in the socket shell. Since the plug we’re using is non-polarized, it doesn’t matter which wire you attach to which terminal. Slide the socket cap down the cord and snap it back to the socket shell.

Step 3: Attach the EZ Grip Plug

Attaching Plug Terminals

Attaching Plug Terminals

Remove the plug cap from the shell by removing the screws on either side of the plug blades. Slide the plug shell out of the plug cap. Feed the free end of the cord through the top of the plug cap, then attach the wires to plug terminals on the shell, just as you did with the socket. Slide the cap back over the shell and replace the screws.

Step 4: Screw in the Bulb

Screwing in the Bulb

Screwing in the Bulb

Screw the bulb into the socket. You can now hang your swag fixture from a ceiling hook and plug it into any wall outlet. Use the built-in dimmer on the socket to adjust the brightness to a suitable level.

Optional Modifications

If you’d like to make a pendant fixture instead of a swag, the modification is simple: Just leave off the EZ grip plug and direct wire the fixture into an existing J-Box.

This is a very simple and versatile fixture, so there are many ways to modify it. You can use a different socket, add a cage or lamp shade over the bulb, twist together multiple pendants to create a chandelier, or even attach the socket to an old table lamp. Do you have other ideas? Post them in the comments, on our Facebook, or let us know on Twitter. Even better, send us a photo of your project and we’ll post it on our Pinterest.

Important Safety Note

This homemade fixture is not UL listed. Use reasonable safety precautions when assembling and installing your fixture. Never leave the fixture unattended or plugged in when not in use.

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