What is Light Pollution?

Jul 30, 14 What is Light Pollution?

For many people, it would be difficult to imagine living in a world where artificial light does not exist. Since the invention of light bulbs in 1879, the use of artificial light sources in everything from street lamps to table lamps has become a major part of the way we live our lives. While man-made light serves many important purposes, specifically in regards to public safety and technological advances, excessive and improper use of it has led to light pollution. The negative consequences of light pollution are many, but there are ways they can be prevented.

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Tips for Planning an Expert Outdoor Lighting Design

Jun 13, 14 Tips for Planning an Expert Outdoor Lighting Design

Nothing can accent the unique features of your home or yard like a carefully planned outdoor lighting design. But how do you plan your lighting without knowing where (or how) to place your lights? While we’ve already introduced a few basic principles of outdoor lighting, we neglected to share what to consider when planning your layout and what lighting techniques are best in certain areas of your landscape. That’s why in this week’s blog, we offer these expert tips and more to help turn your shadowy landscape into a well-lit oasis.

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Introduction to Outdoor Lighting

Mar 26, 14 Introduction to Outdoor Lighting

As most of us are unlikely to be out in our yards enjoying a glass of cool, fresh lemonade in 50-degree weather, it is easy to forget about our outdoor lighting during the cooler months of the year. However, with the warmer weather just around the corner, it’s time to start thinking about how you will be illuminating your yard. Here are some basic considerations everyone should keep in mind for lighting their outdoor areas year-round.

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How to Identify Halogen and Xenon Bi-Pin Bulbs

Jan 11, 13 How to Identify Halogen and Xenon Bi-Pin Bulbs

So one of the bulbs in those little “puck” lights under your kitchen cabinets or the light in your desk lamp has burned out. You may have even had a burn-out with a landscape bullet light. Once you figure out how to get the fixture apart, you find a tiny bulb with two pins you don’t recognize. Now what?

Sure, you can throw the entire fixture out and just get a new one. That may be easier, but it definitely won’t be cheaper. What happens when the bulb burns out again (which it certainly will)? Are you going to just keep buying replacement fixtures?

Relax. We at 1000Bulbs.com have you covered. Identifying and replacing your existing bi-pin xenon bulb (sometimes called ’2-pin bulbs’ or ‘T-bulbs’) is easier than you think. Just follow these five simple steps:

Step 1: Measure the Pin Spacing

How far apart are the pins from each other? You can figure this out by getting a ruler and measuring the space between the pins. The space between the pins is measured in millimeters. Write this measurement down as it will help you find the right base type.

Step 2: Determine the Bulb Voltage

Check the fixture housing or socket and see if there is a label that tells you the voltage of the original bulb. The label will most likely have a UL or CSA symbol. If it’s not on the fixture, try to find it on the bulb itself. When you find the voltage, write it down. If you can’t find the label or the label doesn’t list the voltage, don’t worry. You may still find the correct bulb with some tips coming up in step 4.

Step 3: Check the Pin Type

Now check the pins on your existing bulbs. Are they straight or looped? Most bi-pin bulbs will have straight pins, but there are also bi-pin bulbs that have looped pins. Knowing if the pins are straight or looped will help you to further narrow down your bulb selection. Along with your pin measurements and voltage, make sure to jot down if your pins are looped or straight.

Step 4: Find Your Bulb

Now that you’ve got the bulb spacing, pin type, and (hopefully) voltage, it’s time to find your bulb. If you measured 4 millimeters between pins, that means you have a G4 base bulb, which comes in 6, 12, or 24 volts. If your measurement is just a hair wider than 6 millimeters, you have a bulb with a G6.35 base, which comes in 12, 24, or 120 volts. A measurement of 8 millimeters means you have a G8 base xenon bulb, which only comes in 120 volts. Looped pins spaced 9 millimeters apart means you have a G9 base bulb, which also only comes in 120 volts.

Step 5: Install Your Bulb

After you’ve figured out what bulb you need, installing it is simple. Your fixture has a glass lens that fits over the bulb. After you remove the lens, insert the new bulb into the socket and replace the lens. Be careful not to touch the bulb itself, as the oils on your fingers will damage the bulb, shortening its life and maybe even causing it to melt. Some bulbs come with a wrapping around the bulb to prevent damage when installing them. If your bulb didn’t come with a wrapping, wear gloves or use something to wrap around the bulb, but be sure to remove the wrapping after you install the bulb.

That’s all there is to it. Remember, replacing your bulb is much cheaper than replacing the whole fixture. While replacing the bulb may not be as easy, after a few times, you’ll get the hang of it. If you have any questions about these bulbs or just questions in general, don’t be shy! Drop us a comment in the box below or reach out to us Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus.

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DIY Halloween Ghost Yard Decoration

Oct 19, 12 DIY Halloween Ghost Yard Decoration

Halloween is almost here! If you’re like me, you love being creative and decorating your home. Today, we are going to be talking about making a glowing ghost to haunt the front yard this season! It is super easy to make, inexpensive, and made with things you most likely already have in your house. This crafting idea is fun for the kids as well! You can make your ghost as scary or silly as you’d like!

 

 

Materials to Build Your Ghost

1. Chicken Wire or a Tomato Cage

You’ll need this for the base of the ghost. Tomato cages work best because they require minimal shaping. They come in a variety of sizes and are inexpensive, but if you want to be a little more creative and add more shape to your ghost, then chicken wire is the way to go!

2. An Old Sheet or Piece of Fabric

Typically, you want to use something you would not miss. An old sheet is perfect to use for this project—especially if you want a textured/ripped effect at the bottom of your ghost. You can even use plain fabric of your choice and layer it with sheer fabric for added effects. It’s completely up to you and what look you’re going for!

3. Paint, Fabric, or Paper

There are a wide variety of things you can use for the face of your ghost. Fabric paint is the best method I can recommend. It’s simple, quick, and the kids can help! Not to mention it will last for many Halloweens to come! If you like to sew, you can also take black fabric and cut the eyes and mouth to your sheet. For a quick face without damaging the sheet, painted cardboard or construction paper taped onto the sheet will work just as well.

4. Lights!

For best results, use LED wide angle lightning lights.  The flashing effect of these lights makes your ghost(s) appear then disappear within seconds, making your house even more spooky and fun! The best part about these lights is the fact they’re indestructible and energy efficient! If you don’t have access to these lights, ordinary incandescent or LED mini lights will work as well.

 

Steps to Assemble Your Ghost

Take your base(s) and place wherever needed in the front yard. Keep in mind you may have to run an extension cord, so make sure there are no tripping hazards in the surrounding area. Make sure the base is secured by planting it into the ground.

Take the light strings and begin to wrap it around the base you created. For best results, focus the lights around the head area of your ghost. Think of the lights as a gradient: You want the most concentrated light around the head and have the light fade down the body of the ghost. This will add a spookier, glowing effect, making it look like your ghost is actually floating in your yard!

Once your lights are secured around the base of the ghost, place the “body” (aka sheet) over the base. Turn on your lights, and presto! You have a glowing ghost!

There are many ways to incorporate lighting into your DIY decoration projects. Be sure to check out our Halloween lighting ideas page for more inspiration to decorate your home with this Halloween! Making this for your home? Have your own personal twist to this idea? Share your ideas and photos with us! Drop us a line in comments or on Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus. And if you’re really proud of your creation, be sure to share it on our Pinterest Halloween Pinboard!

 

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