How to Recycle Old or Broken Light Bulbs

Jun 30, 14 How to Recycle Old or Broken Light Bulbs

Most light bulbs are made from glass, and glass is one of the most easily recycled materials on the planet. So recycling light bulbs should be an easy and effective way to top off going green when you upgrade to more energy efficient light bulbs, right? Not quite. Each type of bulb is different and requires different considerations for disposal. So let’s take a look at how to properly recycle your old or broken bulbs.

read more

1000Bulbs.com Offering Kobi Electric 277-Volt LED Reflector Lamps

May 08, 14 1000Bulbs.com Offering Kobi Electric 277-Volt LED Reflector Lamps

Always striving to be on the cutting edge of new and exciting lighting technology, 1000Bulbs.com is pleased to announce it is now offering Kobi Electric 277-volt LED R-style lamps for use in recessed can lights, track lights and more. This new development in LED technology enables energy-efficient lighting upgrades in buildings wired for 90 to 277 input volts.

Relatively new to the LED lighting market, these non-dimmable, 277-volt reflector lamps from Kobi Electric are available in R20, R30 and R40 bulb shapes and range from incandescent equivalents of 50 to 120 watts. Each lamp provides a cool white color temperature at 4100 degrees Kelvin – an optimal color temperature for lighting in commercial spaces.

read more

Leapfrog Lighting Announces a Distribution Partnership with 1000Bulbs.com for its Line of Spec-Quality Light Bulbs

xmas_logo

 

Ottawa—As of December 3, 2013, Leapfrog Lighting’s product line will give 1000Bulbs.com customers a quality spec-quality lamp choice—bulbs traditionally specified by lighting designers, architects, retailers and galleries.

read more

Light Post Lighting News: World’s Worst Light Pollution, Jet Lag Shower, and Edison LEDs

Mar 29, 13 Light Post Lighting News: World’s Worst Light Pollution, Jet Lag Shower, and Edison LEDs

In this week’s issue, we’ll discuss a new way to cure jet lag, the worst city in the world for star gazing, and an Edison LED bulb. So post up in your favorite spot and enjoy Light Post!

Hong Kong is World’s Worst in Light Pollution

While living in a big city hampers your star gazing ability, it certainly fails in comparison to living in Hong Kong. In a study done by faculty of science at the University of Hong Kong, parts of the city are as much as 1,000 times brighter than international norms, giving Hong Kong’s light pollution the title of worst in the world. But why is Hong Kong so bright? Study leader Jason Pun Chun-shing gives us three main reasons: Hong Kong is an extremely densely populated place, the government is obsessed with providing public safety, and unregulated lighting on buildings. However, upward-facing lights and advertising aren’t the only culprits. For Chan Yuk Lung, who runs the astronomy club at Queen’s College, the light pollution issue is overstated: “We have very polluted air in Hong Kong and we have a lot of floating particles in the air and these floating particles reflect light back into our eyes – this is why we feel the sky is so bright at night.”

Delta’s Photon Shower Cleans Off Effect of Jet Lag

Any frequent flyers out there? How do you deal with the time zone changes? Extra coffee? Power naps? Well, caffeine jolts and cat naps may be a thing of the past as Delta Airlines unveiled a Photon Shower earlier this year at the 2013 TED conference in Long Beach, California. This isn’t your typical shower: while you’re rinsing in a light spray of water, you’ll also soak up powerful blue LED lights that create artificial sunlight, therefore rinsing away the effects of jet lag. Delta Airlines explains the importance of light in regards to the body: “The symptoms of jet lag occur because the body gets off schedule, not only because of the day/night pattern of its new location, but with itself. This is where light comes into play.” However, don’t get too excited at the thought of landing at the airport and combating your jet lag, as Delta released the Photon Shower as a concept-only display.

Lighting Science Group Launches Edison-Inspired LED Lamps

One of the reasons people haven’t switched to LEDs is the shape. Some people don’t like the odd shape of some LEDs and therefore won’t switch to them. However, thanks to Lighting Science Group, that is no longer a valid excuse. They have launched a new line of standard shaped (A19) LED bulbs, the Definity Professional, that more closely resemble the typical light bulb shape: “Consumers have been asking the LED industry for bulbs which more closely replicate the form and function of a traditional Edison bulb,” said Lighting Science Group CEO Jeremy Cage. But don’t worry, you won’t have to give up performance for the new shape: these new bulbs are capable of producing up to 71 lumens per watt and capable of dimming down to 5%.

Have any lighting questions? Don’t be shy! Leave us a comment in the box below, or tell us on Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus!

read more

Lighting Law: Chrome Yellow Paint vs. LED Bulbs

Portrait of Gauguin

Portrait of Gauguin

The plaintiff, 125-year old chrome yellow paint, claims the defendant, 90-year old LED lighting, is darkening its bright, beautiful color. The discovery was first announced in November of 2012 when a team of scientists ran some tests using LED lighting against chrome yellow paint, specifically from Van Gogh’s work, Portrait of Gauguin. As Post-Impressionist works are featured in museums today, they need to be featured in a light that enhances their best attributes. Essentially, LEDs are best way to enhance the color and the focal points of the pieces; they do not contain infrared or ultraviolet (UV) radiation. However, could it be possible they are damaging works of art from some of the great masters?

The Plaintiff: Chrome Yellow Paint

To Post-Impressionist artists, like Vincent Van Gogh, color was an important feature in their art. They believed in contrast, making bright colors pop while enhancing the subtlety of dark colors. The chrome pigment, at that time, was popular as it created bold, bright colors. Discovered in 1797, chrome yellow pigment came from the mineral crocoite, lead chromate. It was used in the 1800s, but on a strict basis; the pigment would oxidize and darken over a period of time after being exposed to air. Naturally, the fact that the paint contained lead did not allow for a great reception either, leading to its early demise.

The Defendant: LED Bulbs

We praise LED bulbs; they are efficient, economical, and most of all, safe. They are frequently used in art museums, as the crisp, white light allows colors to pop. LEDs do not emit harmful UV rays, eliminating the risk of color degradation, nor do they emit heat from infrared radiation, removing the possibility of damage; nevertheless, it appears the bulbs seem to be slowly dulling the chrome yellow in these works.

The Surprise Confession: Xenon Bulbs

Breaking news in the courtroom! Upon further investigation, it has come to light that xenon bulbs were the culprit of this heinous crime; xenon bulbs do create heat as well as emit UV rays. While they make for bright, white light, these characteristics of xenon bulbs are not a pleasant companion for the chrome yellow paint featured in Post-Impressionist paintings. These traits do, in fact, speed up the oxidation process of the paint, thus causing the discoloration of the paintings. While some xenon bulbs have UV protection, a small amount of UV rays will still pass through.

Case Dismissed

While LED bulbs caught a bad rap for a short time, they escaped the guillotine of the lighting world. These green, energy efficient bulbs will continue to light the way for our world and our museums. Unfortunately, chrome yellow paint is destined to continue to oxidize, but that doesn’t mean we can’t still enjoy the beauty of in these masterpieces. Imagine how beautiful and bright it was when it was first used.

Comments or questions about LED lighting in a gallery? Let us know! Visit us on Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus!

read more