CFL Warm-Up Times: 4 Bulbs Put to the Test

Jul 13, 12 CFL Warm-Up Times: 4 Bulbs Put to the Test

You know the feeling. You just came home from the hardware store with a blister pack of brand new, energy-saving CFLs. You screw them in and hit the switch. “Oh, this is gonna be good,” you say to yourself. You’re going to save tons of money and your bulbs are gonna look great! Then you notice they’re dim, really dim. Defeated, you retreat to another room to find your receipt. But then, when you return a minute or so later, they’re as bright as you expected them to be! What sorcery is this?

Everyone has had this experience with their first batch of CFLs, though maybe it wasn’t as melodramatic. To understand why compact fluorescents start off dim, you have to know a bit about how fluorescent lighting works. Unlike an incandescent bulb, which creates light by heating a filament until it is white-hot, fluorescent lights use cathodes to heat a special gas or mix of gases to create UV light. The UV light is then filtered through phosphors to create white or colored light. To do this however, the cathodes have to warm up.

The Setup

Every new CFL on the market uses different proprietary technology to shorten the bulb’s warm-up time, with varied results, so we chose to test four of our best-selling 60 watt CFLs. Though this is far from a scientific study, here’s how we conducted the experiment: We screwed each bulb into a lamp, and set a light meter about one foot to the side the lamp. We propped up the light meter so it was roughly on the same horizontal plane as the CFL’s midpoint. We then turned on each bulb and used the light meter to record the maximum light output of the bulb. Finally, we replaced the bulbs with identical bulbs of the same make and model (using the already warm bulb would have skewed our results). We then switched the bulbs on and recorded the time it took to meet the previously recorded maximum output.

Bulb One: Energy Miser

The first bulb we tested is a 13 watt, 2700K CFL from Energy Miser. Just over $1.00 each, this bulb is not only the most inexpensive of the bulbs we tested, but it’s also our best seller. The manufacturer doesn’t make any claims about the bulb’s warm up time, though our customers have given it an average 5-star rating. In our tests, the bulb reached its maximum output in 2 minutes, 2 seconds. That’s not exactly quick, but according to most manufacturers, it’s about on par for a typical CFL.

Bulb Two: TCP TruStart

The second bulb we tested, a TCP TruStart, is a fairly new addition to our product line. In their spec sheet, TCP claims this bulb is the “Best on/off CFL ever made!” Unlike the previous bulb we tested, TCP does make a claim about this bulb’s warm-up time; specifically, TCP says the CFL has a less than 30 second warm-up time. Our tests showed this claim to be mostly true, with the bulb reaching its full brightness at 38.7 seconds.

Bulb Three: Sylvania DULUX EL

The third bulb we tested is from the “big three” of lighting manufacturers, Sylvania. Sylvania also doesn’t make any specific claims about warm-up times for this 13 watt CFL from their DULUX EL family, nor do our customers (who give it an average 4-star rating). So how did this name brand product fare? Pretty well, it turns out. The bulb reached its full brightness at 1 minute, 7 seconds. That not as good as the TCP TruStart, but it’s nearly twice as fast as the Energy Miser.

Bulb Four: TCP InstaBright

The final bulb we tested is a little different from the other four we tested. This covered CFL from TCP has a glass cap over the fluorescent spiral tube so that it looks more like a typical A-shape incandescent bulb. In their InstaBright G2 brochure, TCP claims the bulb has the “Fastest run-up time and significantly improved light build up time,” and it is supposed to reach full brightness in 45 seconds. Surprisingly, this bulb beat even its own estimates, reaching full brightness in only 35.1 seconds!

Which of these bulbs should you buy? It depends how much you’re willing to pay and how much you value fast warm-up times. There is a spread of more than $4.00 between the cheapest and most expensive of these bulbs. Is a few seconds quicker to reach full brightness worth the premium? Let us know what you think in the comments, or connect with us on Facebook, Google+, and Twitter.

read more

New Product Spotlight: TCP LED BR Reflector Bulbs

Jun 15, 12 New Product Spotlight: TCP LED BR Reflector Bulbs

If you’ve read this blog before, you know one of the shortcomings of LED lighting is that LEDs, by nature, project light forward. Manufacturers have posed all kinds of creative solutions to this problem, from frosted caps to space station looking spires of LEDs within the bulb envelope. However, one of our favorite brands here at 1000Bulbs.com claims to have solved this problem, at least for reflector bulbs, with a surprisingly simple solution.

The LED reflector light bulb market is saturated with Halogen PAR clones. PAR lamps, which are a directional light source anyway, are an obvious format for LED. The PAR format allows LEDs to show off their energy saving potential without addressing the directional problem of LEDs. As a result, LED bulbs such as the MSi iPAR38 have been a big hit, especially with businesses, but not so much with homeowners who prefer the shape of traditional incandescent BR- and R-type bulbs.

TCP took this challenge to heart when they created their new line of BR LED bulbs. The “guts” of the incandescent-inspired bulbs are the same as an LED PAR lamp, but the face is capped with a round, frosted lens to refract the light coming from the LEDs. This refraction creates a softer beam spread more similar to that of incandescent bulbs. Plus, when used in recessed cans, the bulbs look just like the incandescents they replace.

The light quality of the bulbs is equally impressive. The BR LED line has a CRI (Color Rendering Index) of 85, higher than the usual 80-82 of most LED bulbs. The dimming quality is great, too. TCP has manufactured the bulbs to be dimmable down to 0.5%, and our tests show them to be compatible with both analog and electronic dimmers, which until now, we had never seen on an LED bulb.

TCP’s new line of LED reflector light bulbs includes BR40, BR30, and R20 LED bulbs, available in 2400K and 2700K versions. The BR40 and BR30 can replace 65 watt and 85 watt incandescent bulbs, respectively. The R20 replaces a 50 watt incandescent. All the bulbs are rated for 25,000 hours and carry a 5-year manufacturer warranty. The mercury-free LED bulbs save approximately 80% of the energy used by similar Halogen bulbs.

read more

Do We Need Light Bulbs Anymore?

May 04, 12 Do We Need Light Bulbs Anymore?

While we will always need light, could it be possible that in the quest to create the “perfect” light bulb, a bulb isn’t what we are looking for at all? Edison’s original invention required the familiar gas-filled bubble we call a bulb to house and protect a carbon filament, and blown glass was the best, most efficient option. Yet that was over 100 years ago, and technology has brought us all types of materials that Edison may have considered better alternatives than a glass bulb.

The idea that we no longer need light bulbs is either revolutionary or absurd, but two products on our website are created with that very idea in mind. One is the LED downlight module, and the other is a series of LED tape light “profiles” from Poland-based Klus Design. One product suggests replacing traditional light fixtures and bulbs with dedicated, modular retrofits, while the other suggests we can do without light fixtures and bulbs altogether.

LED downlights consist of an array of high-powered LEDs, an LED driver, and a heatsink all integrated into a single unit. This alone doesn’t make downlights that much different than any LED light bulb. The difference is in the appearance of the product. The manufacturer doesn’t intend to make the module look like anything like the familiar light bulb we know. Instead, the LED module is a geometric mass of aluminum fins and hard plastic that replaces the bulb within a recessed can, sometimes permanently.

The second product, LED tape light profiles, takes the concept further. As we discussed in a previous article, LED tape light is an extremely versatile and easy to use product. To prove this, Klus even used tape light and their patented aluminum profiles to create a “House Without a Bulb.” Klus tape light profiles—an aluminum extrusion that houses an LED tape light—are inlayed into a groove cut into the underside of a step or cabinet, or mounted to the top of a flat surface. Some models are even made for installation into floors, sidewalks, and driveways. As with the LED modules, you never see a bulb, just light emanating from a recessed area that blends in with its surroundings. It blends in so well, in fact, the casual observer would be hard-pressed to determine where the light is coming from.

Even before LED downlights and tape light profiles, we turned the traditional round light bulb into reflectors, imitation flames, high efficiency tubes, and compact spirals. Do we need the “bulb” shape any longer for anything more than nostalgia? Share your responses in the comments below, or drop us a line on Facebook, Twitter, or Google+.

read more

How Do Infrared (IR) Halogens Save Energy?

Apr 06, 12 How Do Infrared (IR) Halogens Save Energy?

In a recent article, we discussed the impending phase out of Halogen PAR lamps. One of the technologies we listed as a replacement was Infrared (IR) Halogen. But what is an IR Halogen, and how does it save energy? To answer that, let’s first do a brief refresher on freshman physics.

Visible light is only one part of the electromagnetic spectrum, which in its highest frequency includes gamma rays and in its lowest frequency, microwaves. Somewhere in between is visible light, which itself is sandwiched between higher frequency ultraviolet rays and lower frequency infrared rays. (For those of you who like videos, check out the Electromagnetic Spectrum Song on YouTube for more detail.)

Electromagnetic rays aren’t neatly delineated like they’re shown in textbooks but instead, tend to “bleed” together, with visible light also including some UV and IR rays. When a light source ventures into the UV rays’ territory, the light may fade clothing, paintings, and anything sensitive to UV. Similarly, when a light source ventures into the infrared spectrum, infrared heat overwhelms visible light. This “bleeding” is why incandescent bulbs are so inefficient. Ever try to unscrew an incandescent light bulb when it’s been burning for an hour or so? It’s hot, isn’t it? That’s because as much as 90% of the electromagnetic rays produced by an incandescent bulb are in the form of infrared heat; only the remaining 10% is visible light.

Halogen light bulbs are a tweaked form of incandescent bulbs that are slightly more efficient. Nevertheless, they still waste energy in the form of UV and infrared rays. For this reason, manufacturers started adding dichroic coatings to Halogen lamps (especially MR16 bulbs) so that they redirected heat and infrared through the back of the bulb instead of the front, reducing possible damage to the object lit by the lamp. Still, this only protects the work of art, retail display, or whatever object at which the user aims the lamp. It doesn’t do much, if anything, to reduce energy consumption.

GE HIR Plus Table

HIR PAR Lamps Save 40%

From there, manufacturers developed a new idea: Why not coat the Halogen capsule within the bulb? The result is an IR Halogen, in which the infrared heat coming from the bulb filament is redirected right back on the filament, causing it to burn hotter and brighter while still using the same amount of electricity. In other words, a 60 watt Halogen bulb (for example)  when given an IR coating to its internal capsule, is bright enough to equal the light output of about a 90 watt Halogen.

So just how much energy do IR Halogen PAR lamps save? The rule of thumb is about 40%. Sylvania’s 50 watt IR PAR38 (130V), for example, produces 850 lumens, equivalent to a standard 130V Halogen PAR38 of about 75 watts. A savings of 25 watts is very significant, especially considering even small retail shops can be running as many as 100 PAR38 bulbs at a time. The savings over an incandescent PAR38 or R40 are even more dramatic—as high as 60%. For a more detailed wattage equivalency, check out the chart from GE to the right.

IR Halogen bulbs also have an indirect benefit on energy usage: Since the coating puts the wasted infrared energy to use by redirecting it inward and transforming it to visual light, the total heat emitted by the bulb is reduced, lightening the load on HVAC systems.

IR Halogens are now available in most Halogen bulb types, including IR PAR20 bulbs, IR PAR30 bulbs, IR PAR38 bulbs, and IR MR16 bulbs. Our advice would be to switch over now, even though the phase-out isn’t yet in effect. Why? If you wait and hold on to your less efficient Halogens, you’re throwing away money on wasted electricity!

read more

New Product Spotlight: Kobi LED Light Bulbs

Mar 16, 12 New Product Spotlight: Kobi LED Light Bulbs

Do you want to switch to LED lighting but just aren’t ready for the up-front cost? We often recommend switching to LED, but let’s face it: LEDs are expensive, as this week’s Philips $50 LED light bulb debacle made very clear. At 1000Bulbs.com, however, we’re trying to destroy the notion that you can’t afford to go LED.

One of our first steps in that direction is our partnership with Kobi Electric, a manufacturer of low-priced LED light bulbs. This partnership adds 10 new products to our LED lighting selection, including six standard shape LED light bulbs and four LED reflector bulbs.

Our friends at Kobi say they are “established for one purpose: to finally make LED lighting for the home affordable to everyone.” We at 1000Bulbs.com think that’s great, so we’re helping them by pricing their LED bulbs as low as possible. Their 40 watt equal LED is currently around $16 on our website, far less than the usual $25 to $45 you’d pay for a “name brand” LED bulb.

But don’t let the price fool you! These aren’t the junk you find next to the dog food and panty hose at the grocery store. Kobi’s LED light bulbs have some of the most impressive light output we’ve seen, and certainly one of the best warranties. All Kobi LED bulbs carry a warranty that guarantees your bulb will maintain at least 80% of its original light output throughout its 30,000 hour life (about 20 years at 4hrs/day).

We aren’t the only ones singing the praises of Kobi’s products, either. Our customers have consistently rated Kobi’s bulbs with 4 and 5-star reviews. Check out this customer review for a Kobi LED R30 flood light: “The Kobi bulbs are very bright, very well designed bulbs. I am impressed how much light they produce for so little power. I calculate that they will pay for themselves within 1-2 years.”

Other reviewers praise Kobi’s dimming capability, and for good reason. Most LED light bulbs, if they even are dimmable, are compatible with a very restricted list of dimmers. That means in addition to buying a $25 bulb, you also need to buy and install a new dimmer. This isn’t the case with Kobi. They’ve made sure their LED bulbs are compatible with the most popular dimmers in homes today, and even provide a pamphlet of recommended dimmers just in case.

So Kobi LED bulbs are inexpensive, excellent quality, and dimmable. What more do you need? Pick up a few and let us know what you think!

read more