How to Light your Jewelry Display

Nov 05, 14 How to Light your Jewelry Display

Blue diamond engagement rings should speak for themselves. So should the other gorgeous jewels inside the cases across your shop. Yet even with unique hand cut diamonds and superb pricing, your merchandise still has to leave a ‘sparkle’ in the customers’ eyes. The most common sentence uttered in a jewelry store? “It just doesn’t shine enough.”

One of the biggest attractions when visiting a jewelry store is seeing the dazzle of the diamonds. Without that dazzle, no matter how lovely or interesting the jewels being sold are, individuals are not as attracted to the merchandise. Lighting plays an especially crucial role when discussing the “four C’s” of diamonds, which are clarity, cut, color and carat. For each of these qualities to be seen properly, diamonds must be placed in the proper lighting. Lighting in the store and inside of display cases should complement diamonds , and  entice buyers.

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Fluorescent Lights and Headaches

Oct 22, 14 Fluorescent Lights and Headaches

Thrashing pain meets you at the forefront of your temples, and suddenly it feels like someone has continually slammed your head against concrete. It’s a migraine and the culprit can sometimes be fluorescent lighting. But what can you do? Your office is filled with fluorescent lights and that old computer you use at home isn’t helping the situation. Luckily, there are solutions to your problem, but first, let’s figure out what’s really going on with that head of yours.

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Poultry Persuasion: The Best Lighting Sources for Chicken

Oct 01, 14 Poultry Persuasion: The Best Lighting Sources for Chicken

Whether you have a teeny coop in the city or a larger barn for your birds of beauty, lighting is vital to the health and vigor of your poultry. Small amounts of lighting during brooding or excessive lighting during growth season may result in financial or production loss for owners. Controlling lumens, temperature and color temperature are essential for chickens.  This means that without the proper lighting, chickens may produce fewer eggs or fail to gain weight in a timely manner. Poultry perceive light differently than we do.  For instance, where we see a yellowish or white glow from a bulb, poultry perceive the light as red because of their intense sensitivity to UV rays. Incidentally, this red light has a longer wavelength which enters the skull and skin of the chickens, prompting them to lay eggs.  In the past, incandescent lamps were often used for poultry lighting, but these traditional lights are now fading due to their short lifespans, increased heat, and higher energy costs.  To ensure the health and productivity of your poultry, let’s break down a few alternative lighting options you may want to consider for your broiler house.

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An Explanation for CFL Pin Types

Aug 18, 14 An Explanation for CFL Pin Types

It’s never a bad idea to use energy-efficient lights, but a quick search for a compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) can show far too many different types of CFLs to make the selection easy.  One of the most notable differences the type of base used by each bulb.  In fact, the standard screw-in bulb you’re looking for is the minority when it comes to base types on CFLs.  Commercial CFLs don’t typically find their way into homes, but for the new shop owner or the rare occurrence of a commercial CFL in a residential building, you’ll find a strange socket that’s unlike the typical housing bulbs you’re used to.  Let’s unpack the differences so you’ll be ready to get the right replacement bulb if you find yourself here.

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Light Bulb Ban: The Late Great T8 700 Series

Jul 07, 14 Light Bulb Ban: The Late Great T8 700 Series

This past January, EISA brought us the final phase out of 60-watt incandescent bulbs. But two years ago, the phase out program removed some halogen PAR lamps, T12 linear fluorescent lamps, as well as some less popular 2-ft. and 4-ft. T8s. The T8 700 series fluorescent lamps were just shy of the chopping block on the previous phase out, but were given a two-year extension.  On July 14th, 2014, all T8 700 series fluorescent lamps will fail to meet the new minimum energy ratings and will no longer be produced.  The new ratings increased the minimum allowable values for lumen efficacy (lumens-per-watt), wattage, and minimum color rendering for each lamp.  The 700 series of fluorescent T8s has terrible color rendering (averaging in the low 70s) while the newer 800 and 900 series of lamps deliver more vibrant color saturation at CRI levels of 80-85.

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