Fire Safety 101, Part 2: Accessories and Placement

Mar 01, 13 Fire Safety 101, Part 2: Accessories and Placement

In part 1 of this series, we discussed the types of fire alarms and the advantages of each. Here, we’ll discuss a few essential fire safety accessories and where to place your alarms.

Relay Modules

Alarm relay modules are great tools to link your smoke, CO, and heat alarms to auxiliary devices, such as sirens, strobe lights, door closers, exhaust fans, etc. When one of the alarms sounds, the alarm relay module activates your connected auxiliary devices. These devices are excellent for providing additional warning in the event of an emergency.

Strobe Lights

Strobe lights are another great tool for providing early warning for fire and CO dangers. Strobe lights must be connected to smoke, heat, or carbon monoxide alarms. When an alarm sounds, it activates the strobe light, giving off an intensely bright light.

Even though strobe lights are designed for those with hearing impairment, they can still be used in homes without hearing impaired individuals, especially for those who may have a hard time being woken up by fire or CO alarms. Since they are not designed to detect any fire or CO threats, these are not standalone devices.

Alright, so you’ve decided which fire alarms are right for you, but where do you put these alarms for maximum efficiency?

Placement

The U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) recommends you put smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement. Since many fatal fires typically start late at night or early in the morning, the USFA also recommends installing alarms both inside and outside of sleeping areas. Installing alarms inside and outside is especially helpful if you have heavy sleepers in your home or sleep with the bedroom door closed.

For large houses, make sure you have more than the recommended number of fire alarms. Put these in living rooms, studies, and other non-sleeping areas. Also keep in mind that smoke and deadly gases rise, so fire alarms should be installed at proper levels. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions on placement height.

For an example of fire alarm placement, check out this diagram.

Comments or questions about smoke alarms or their placement? Let us know in the comments below or follow us on Facebook, Google Plus, or Twitter!

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How to Identify Halogen and Xenon Bi-Pin Bulbs

Jan 11, 13 How to Identify Halogen and Xenon Bi-Pin Bulbs

So one of the bulbs in those little “puck” lights under your kitchen cabinets or the light in your desk lamp has burned out. You may have even had a burn-out with a landscape bullet light. Once you figure out how to get the fixture apart, you find a tiny bulb with two pins you don’t recognize. Now what?

Sure, you can throw the entire fixture out and just get a new one. That may be easier, but it definitely won’t be cheaper. What happens when the bulb burns out again (which it certainly will)? Are you going to just keep buying replacement fixtures?

Relax. We at 1000Bulbs.com have you covered. Identifying and replacing your existing bi-pin xenon bulb (sometimes called ’2-pin bulbs’ or ‘T-bulbs’) is easier than you think. Just follow these five simple steps:

Step 1: Measure the Pin Spacing

How far apart are the pins from each other? You can figure this out by getting a ruler and measuring the space between the pins. The space between the pins is measured in millimeters. Write this measurement down as it will help you find the right base type.

Step 2: Determine the Bulb Voltage

Check the fixture housing or socket and see if there is a label that tells you the voltage of the original bulb. The label will most likely have a UL or CSA symbol. If it’s not on the fixture, try to find it on the bulb itself. When you find the voltage, write it down. If you can’t find the label or the label doesn’t list the voltage, don’t worry. You may still find the correct bulb with some tips coming up in step 4.

Step 3: Check the Pin Type

Now check the pins on your existing bulbs. Are they straight or looped? Most bi-pin bulbs will have straight pins, but there are also bi-pin bulbs that have looped pins. Knowing if the pins are straight or looped will help you to further narrow down your bulb selection. Along with your pin measurements and voltage, make sure to jot down if your pins are looped or straight.

Step 4: Find Your Bulb

Now that you’ve got the bulb spacing, pin type, and (hopefully) voltage, it’s time to find your bulb. If you measured 4 millimeters between pins, that means you have a G4 base bulb, which comes in 6, 12, or 24 volts. If your measurement is just a hair wider than 6 millimeters, you have a bulb with a G6.35 base, which comes in 12, 24, or 120 volts. A measurement of 8 millimeters means you have a G8 base xenon bulb, which only comes in 120 volts. Looped pins spaced 9 millimeters apart means you have a G9 base bulb, which also only comes in 120 volts.

Step 5: Install Your Bulb

After you’ve figured out what bulb you need, installing it is simple. Your fixture has a glass lens that fits over the bulb. After you remove the lens, insert the new bulb into the socket and replace the lens. Be careful not to touch the bulb itself, as the oils on your fingers will damage the bulb, shortening its life and maybe even causing it to melt. Some bulbs come with a wrapping around the bulb to prevent damage when installing them. If your bulb didn’t come with a wrapping, wear gloves or use something to wrap around the bulb, but be sure to remove the wrapping after you install the bulb.

That’s all there is to it. Remember, replacing your bulb is much cheaper than replacing the whole fixture. While replacing the bulb may not be as easy, after a few times, you’ll get the hang of it. If you have any questions about these bulbs or just questions in general, don’t be shy! Drop us a comment in the box below or reach out to us Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus.

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Five Christmas Decorations You May Have Missed

Nov 30, 12 Five Christmas Decorations You May Have Missed

Christmas is only 24 days away, but it’s not too late to put on your best lighting display ever! You may think you already know everything about Christmas lights and decorations, but there are a few awesome products you may have missed. Here are five of our favorites.

Bubble Lights

Bring back your (or your parents’) childhood memories with candelabra base bubble lights. Used since the 1940s, these unique bulbs aren’t as popular as they once were, but they’re a great idea for a retro-style Christmas. Each bubble light houses a tiny incandescent bulb that creates both heat and light to bubble the liquid within the tube. They even work as nightlights when the holidays are over!

Color-Changing LED Bulbs

Jealous of your neighbor’s Christmas light show, but don’t have time to set up complicated controllers? Wouldn’t it be nice if you could just screw in some magic bulbs that did all of the work for you? Color-changing LED Christmas bulbs are just what you’re looking for! Simply replace your existing incandescent or LED C7 or C9 bulbs with these and watch as they cycle through red, blue, green, yellow, orange, and purple.

LED Snowfall Lights

If you live in a climate like ours here in Dallas, you may have given up hope for a White Christmas. But hang LED Snowfall lights from your trees and you can still watch the “snow” fall in the night sky. Ranging from 7 inches to over 6 feet long, each set of these suspended, water-resistant tubes contain cool white LEDs that chase and drift in randomized patterns, emulating a beautiful and calming snowfall.

Battery-Operated Candles

Ideal for candlelit Christmas ceremonies and picturesque holiday displays, battery-operated candles are a safer and cleaner alternative to real candles. Great for windows, tables, and mantles, the wax-drip details and metallic bases of these incandescent and LED candles add a traditional look and feel to any space.

Christmas Light Stringers

C7 and C9 Christmas light stringers are the pro’s secret to a perfect outdoor holiday display. Not only can you choose whatever color of incandescent or LED bulb to use with these stringers, you can also cut them to fit any surface. Reached the end of your gutter? Cut off the excess wire and cap it. Visit our site to pick up whatever length you need, but don’t forget the end plugs!

So what are your holiday decorating ideas this year? Let us know in the comments and drop us a line on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, or Pinterest!

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How to Set Up a Christmas Tree Like a Pro

Nov 16, 12 How to Set Up a Christmas Tree Like a Pro

You’ve set up your Christmas tree and gathered the family around, Clark Griswold-style. You plug in the lights and voilà!

A second goes by before you hear a collective groan. Your tree is so gnarled and lopsided it looks like it’s being slowly eaten away by moths. Half of the lights don’t work, and the other half only flicker. In short, your Christmas tree doesn’t look anything like the picture on the box.

Professional interior designers know setting up an artificial Christmas tree isn’t as easy as it looks. They know just how to adjust, test, and tweak until a Christmas tree looks bright and full, virtually oozing holiday cheer. Fortunately, you can do the same. Use these 4 professional tips for a problem-free tree this year!

Tip #1: Set Up the Stand the Right Way

First, set up your tree stand. Though this may not require the touch of an interior designer, it is literally the foundation to everything that comes after.

For two-piece steel or plastic stands, simply slide the two pieces together and apply slight pressure to the center hub until it clicks. For one-piece fold-up stands, open the legs to their locking position and tighten the bottom thumbscrew to secure. If you have a one-piece stand, no assembly is required.

If your stand is wobbly or flimsy, throw it away and get a real Christmas tree stand made with sturdy materials, superior craftsmanship, and wheels to make the tree easier to move and store.

Christmas Tree Bases

Christmas Tree Bases

Tip# 2: Assemble the Tree Once Piece at a Time

Second, assemble the tree, taking time to adjust and level as you do so. Patience is key.

Insert the bottom section of the tree into the stand. Secure the tree by tightening the thumbscrews and allow the hinged branches to fall into their natural, horizontal position.

If you have a multi-section tree, add the other sections, taking care to lubricate the pole ends for easy insertion and removal at the end of the holiday season.

Tip #3: Shape the Tree Like a Pro

There are two basic ways to shape a tree: The traditional “V” shape and the “upswept” shape.

For a traditional shape, separate all the small limbs from the main branch, then work from the trunk outward, moving one limb up and one limb down, forming a “V” shape. Also form a “V” with the second set of limbs, but instead of up and down, angle one to the left and one to the right.

For an upswept tree shape, simply angle the limbs outward and upward, as if wind were blowing from the bottom of the tree.

Christmas Tree Shaping

Traditional Shaping (Top) and Upswept Shaping (Bottom)

Tip #4: Test Lights and Apply them Section-by-Section

Unless you have a pre-lit Christmas tree, the next step is to add your Christmas lights. Before you start, however, plug in each set of lights to make sure they work. Test for burned out bulbs and partially dead strings with a light tester and avoid the hassle and embarrassment of having to redecorate your tree halfway through Christmas dinner.

Now start lighting the tree, but not all at once. Make sure your tree is evenly lighted by hanging lights section-by-section and making corrections as you go.

Share Your Ideas

For more Christmas tips and tricks, check out previous articles on how to buy a Christmas tree, how to select mini lights, and how to throw a non-traditional Christmas celebration. Share your own tips in the comments, or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube, and Pinterest.

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Christmas Mini Lights Buying Guide

Nov 09, 12 Christmas Mini Lights Buying Guide

Walk into any big box store this holiday season and you’ll see two, maybe three, options for Christmas mini lights: Number of bulbs, bulb color, and if you’re lucky, wire color. After all, these are the only choices most people consider.

But “most” people aren’t informed buyers. Any informed buyer craves selection, and that’s why we offer literally hundreds of mini light choices at 1000Bulbs.com.

Of course, with so many choices available, we realize it can be frustrating to find just the right mini lights you need, so to make that process easier, here’s a quick guide to buying mini lights.

Bulb Spacing

Have you ever had to double or triple-wrap a Christmas tree with lights to make it bright enough? The typical set of mini lights has bulb spacing (the amount of wire between individual bulbs) of 12 inches. In almost all cases, that’s too far apart.

The maximum bulb spacing for a Christmas tree, gutter, or house trim should be 6 inches, not 12. To wrap an outdoor tree trunk, pole, or banister, tighter bulb spacing of 4 inches is better. For wreaths, garlands, and other objects with a small diameter, you may even want to go with 2.5 inch spacing.

Wire Gauge

Wire gauge isn’t just a topic for electricians. When it comes to mini lights, the thicker the wire, the longer it lasts and the more end-to-end connections you can make.

The standard wire gauge for mini lights is 22 AWG, but for especially long runs or harsh outdoor conditions, use a thicker wire gauge of 20 or even 18 AWG (the smaller the number, the thicker the gauge).

Lead and Tail Length

Lead length is the distance from the outlet (the male plug) to the first bulb in a set of mini lights. It is typically 3 to 6 inches, but many shorter “craft” lights have longer leads of 2 feet or more.

Longer leads are great for wall-mounted items like wreaths that are usually far away from a wall socket. Having a longer lead means you won’t have lights “floating in space” before they reach their destination.

Tail length is the other end of the string (the female plug) that connects to the next string in the series.

Connection Options

Mentioned earlier in the section on wire gauge, mini lights with a thicker wire gauge are able to handle more end-to-end connections. Though the exact number may vary, most 22 AWG 100 light sets are UL listed for up to three end-to-end (male to female) connections. A 20 AWG set of the same length may be rated for twice that—6 connections. Exceed that recommendation and the fuses within the light string will overload and burn out.

Interestingly, the recommendation for a 50 light set is usually the same. Why? For safety reasons, UL does not recommend more than three end-to-end connections for a 22 AWG string light of any length. If you plan a particularly long run, it is better to use a few 100 or 150 light stands than several shorter strands.

What Are Your Plans?

What are your Christmas lighting plans this year? Let us know what you have in store. Drop us a line in the comments below, or connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus. If you have something especially interesting, we may even pin it on Pinterest!

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