Something Old, Something New, Something Lit, and Something Blue

Wedding Lighting with Color Splash

Wedding Lighting with Color Splash

June is quickly approaching; which means wedding season is upon us! Every girl dreams of the perfect wedding. Once the infamous question has been asked, the details of flowers, invitations, and napkins consume her mind. One minor detail that can make all the difference in the world is the lighting. Here are a few ideas to give your wedding lighting that extra sparkle.

Add a Splash of Color

While frantic about most things during wedding preparation, brides will always be sure of one thing, wedding colors. Why not enhance your wedding decor with colored bulbs? Whether you choose LED, halogen, or incandescent bulbs, adding a little touch of color to your wedding lighting will give your wedding originality. Place them in areas where you are looking for a colorful accent or back light.

Get Creative with Christmas Lights

What? Yes, use your Christmas light strings! Everyone has their Christmas light strings stored in their attic; get more use out of them! They may not seem like much, but they can make all the difference at your wedding. You can use them as an accent with tulle or line them along railings. Icicle light curtains are a stunning addition to wall decor, adding a distinguished ambiance with a simple elegance.

Charm with Candlelit Ambiance

The Uttermost cast iron and wood candelabra makes a beautiful, unique wedding centerpiece for reception tables. It has a rustic appeal with iron candle holders, finished in black, and a wooden base. Adorn it with white flowers or place a satin fabric around it to add a delicate touch to this stunning piece. For convenience, try battery operated LED candles with a flicker effect.

Dazzle with Twinkling Light Spheres

With a 12-foot lead wire, twinkling light spheres are a one-of-a-kind original! These intriguing light spheres come in a wide variety of colors and shapes, bringing a distinctive character to any festivity. The bulbs of the light spheres give off a stunning glitter effect, augmenting your wedding lighting. Hang them in a gazebo or off of trees, if you are outdoors, or over your reception tables, if you are indoors.

DIY Jar Lights

DIY Mason Jar

DIY Mason Jar

Jar lights make beautiful centerpieces for wedding reception tables. They are easy to make and add a simple, yet enchanting appeal to your wedding decor. Here’s what you need:

  • 0.5 gal. Mason Jar
  • Battery-Powered Light String
  • Rubber Band
  • Ribbon (color optional)
  • 3 8×8 in. Squares of Tulle (color optional)
  • Wire (optional)

Insert the light string into the jar. Place the tulle over the top of the jar and secure it with the rubber band. Tie the ribbon around the top of the jar to add ornamental detail. If you are interested in hanging it, wrap a thin wire around the top to create an arch; then tie the ribbon around it.

If you have any ideas you would like to share about wedding lighting, let us know in the comments section or send a message on Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus!

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Watts for Dessert? A Look at Edible Lighting Technologies

Everyone has heard the adage “my dog ate my homework.” Educators would say this is an excruciatingly poor excuse for not doing homework. However, “my dog ate my lamp, so I couldn’t do my homework” may soon become a legitimate excuse.

Thanks to some incredibly creative artists, the lighting world has a new addition, edible lamps. A sweet treat and good for the environment, these lamps definitely bring a new, distinctive quality to lighting.

Lumière au Chocolat

Lumière au Chocolat

Lumière au Chocolat

Delicious, scrumptious, and delectable, all words to define a lamp. What’s so tasty about a lamp? The idea that it is made of chocolate is a start. A Swedish designer by the name of Alexander Lervik worked with LED specialists from Saas Instruments to create the Lumière au Chocolat (Chocolate Lamp), which was on display at the Stockholm Furniture Fair. Influenced by the concept of polar nights, the lamp, as solid trapezoid of chocolate, is completely dark when turned on. As the heat from an incandescent bulb hits the chocolate, it starts to form holes, allowing more light to pass through. Once the chocolate thoroughly melts down, it slowly forms back into solid pieces for a delectable treat. Perhaps this lamp isn’t ideal for homework; it could be a wonderful addition to a restaurant’s dessert menu.

BITE ME

BITE ME LED desk lamp

BITE ME LED desk lamp

Not a chocolate fan? No worries! New York based designer Victor Vetterlein’s BITE ME bioplastic LED desk lamp is made from natural, non-toxic ingredients including agar (a gelatin formed from sea algae), flavoring, food coloring, purified water, and vegetable glycerin. Coming in flavors of apple, blueberry, orange, and cherry, this lamp resembles a fruit roll-up with the solidity of plastic. The lamp includes an LED circuit board with an adhesive strip to be placed on the underside of the lamp and two power cords, one to be connected to a low voltage power converter and the other to a USB port. Once the lamp becomes a terrible bore, toss it in your backyard as compost or eat it, of course. Simply wash the lamp with organic soap and warm water and soak it in water for an hour; it will soften and have the consistency and taste of a fruit snack.

Time to Eat

Roald Dahl would be proud; we’ve gotten a step closer to Willy Wonka’s “world of pure imagination.” While we haven’t quite gotten to the full-fledged chocolate waterfall or 3-course meal gum, we do have edible lamps. Interested in one of the two, or both? Unfortunately for all of us, these lamps are not currently for sale, but we’ll be standing in line next to you when they are.

What do you think about edible lamps? Leave us a comment or visit us on Facebook, Google Plus, or Twitter!

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Energy-Saving Light Bulbs (Video)

Today’s article takes a slightly different approach than usual. One of the questions we often get here on the blog and in our Wednesday Lighting Q&A on Facebook is about energy-saving bulbs. Specifically, people want to know what defines an energy-saving light bulb and what makes an LED better than a CFL, a CFL better than a Halogen, or any variant on that question.

With that in mind, we’ve recorded a short, introductory video that we hope will answer most of your questions. Of course, we’ll gladly answer any remaining questions you may have in the comments section below, on our Facebook page, or on our Twitter or Google Plus accounts. You can also check out our related Squidoo article, also titled “Energy-Saving Light Bulbs.”

So grab some popcorn and sit back! (Assuming that’s OK with your boss)

 

 

[TRANSCRIPT]

Welcome to 1000Bulbs.com, the Internet’s number one retailer of light bulbs and lighting products. In today’s video, we’ll be discussing a very popular but often misunderstood topic: Energy-saving light bulbs.

“Energy-saving” is a term thrown around pretty often these days, especially referring to light bulbs. But just what is an energy-saving light bulb? Though there is no strict definition of an energy-saving bulb, one thing is certain: It must be more efficient than an incandescent bulb. That said, energy-saving bulbs fall into one of three product types: Halogen light bulbs, compact fluorescents (more commonly known as “CFLs”), and light-emitting diodes, better known simply as “LEDs.” Let’s look at each bulb type one-by-one to understand their benefits.

First, for reference, we have incandescent light bulbs. Though they’re old technology, they’re still very common. On the plus side, incandescent light bulbs are inexpensive and completely dimmable. However, these attributes are overshadowed by how inefficient they are as well as their short lifespan.

Next, we have the first of our energy savers, the Halogen light bulb. You’ll notice that these look very similar to incandescent bulbs. Also like incandescent bulbs, Halogen bulbs are inexpensive and dimmable. However, Halogens only last about 1,000 hours, and they’re only 15 to 20 percent more efficient than incandescent bulbs.

Now we have the compact fluorescent, which is probably what you think of when you hear about energy-saving bulbs. CFLs have many positive attributes, including being relatively inexpensive, at least in comparison to LEDs, as well as lasting eight times longer than an incandescent or Halogen and using about 80% less energy than an incandescent bulb. Unfortunately, most compact fluorescents are non-dimmable. They also contain a small amount of toxic mercury, so they have to be recycled, and some people find their characteristic spiral shape off-putting.

Finally, we can discuss LED light bulbs. Not only are these the most efficient light bulbs available to homeowners, they last 50,000 hours or more, and most models are fully dimmable. Of course, anything has drawbacks, including LED. These bulbs are an emerging technology, so manufacturers are still working out some of their “kinks.” Also, as a new technology, LEDs are still relatively expensive, though their prices are dropping rapidly as technology improves.

So let’s look at these four bulbs side-by-side: An incandescent bulb produces 13.3 lumens–the standard measurement of light output–for each watt of energy used. A Halogen light bulb is only slightly more efficient, producing 16 lumens per watt. Compact fluorescents, however, make a huge leap in efficiency, producing 61.5 lumens per watt. But by far the most efficient is LED, which produces nearly 90 lumens per watt!

To learn more, be sure to visit 1000Bulbs.com!

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Your Guide to Incandescent Light Bulbs

Aug 03, 12 Your Guide to Incandescent Light Bulbs

With today’s emphasis on energy efficiency in lighting, it’s easy to forget that our old, inefficient friend, the incandescent light bulb, still exists. In fact, it may never go away. The lowly incandescent isn’t just the less-efficient alternative to modern bulbs, it is oftentimes the only bulb available for many everyday applications.

Standard Shape

They’re known as A-shape, pear shape, or traditional, but most people just call them light bulbs. Standard shape bulbs are the old-fashioned bulbs that many of you are still using or are hoarding in your attic. Though these bulbs are the type most directly affected by EISA 2007 and other lighting legislation, lower-wattage and special application bulbs aren’t going away anytime soon.

Low Voltage

Have an RV or a camper? Chances are you use one of these 12 or 24 volt light bulbs. Other applications include landscape and outdoor lighting, especially battery-powered. Though they look just like other bulbs, don’t use them in your home, or they’ll blow out in a fraction of a second!

Antique and Vintage

An increasingly popular bulb type, antique bulbs are reproductions of bulbs made in the 19th century, with many very closely resembling the original bulb made by Thomas Edison himself. Though they are highly inefficient, even in comparison to other incandescent bulbs, these beautiful creations are popular in restaurants, retail stores, and of course, home restorations.

Spot and Flood

Though Halogen reflector bulbs are more popular, incandescent spot and flood lights are popular options for recessed cans in homes, businesses, and even elevators. Many are also weatherproof, making them a good choice for covered outdoor fixtures.

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - APRIL 19:  McDonald's fren...

French fries under a heat lamp (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)

Infrared

Also known simply as “heat lamps,” these reflector bulbs emit more infrared heat than light. In effect, they are heaters you can screw into a light socket. Infrared heat lamps are commonly used in fast food warmers, buffets, and even household bathrooms.

Decorative Chandelier

Meant to replicate the look of a flame, these bulbs are what you see in chandeliers, electric candles, and a host of other decorative light fixtures. The most popular versions are straight tip (torpedo) and bent tip, but specialty bulbs like shaped like prisms, satin string bulbs made to reproduce a gas flame, and flicker flame bulbs are also common.

Decorative Globe

Used in holiday lights and outdoor light stringers as well as bathroom vanities and even as a non-traditional alternative for chandeliers, globe bulbs are nearly as widespread as standard shape bulbs.

Tubular

Tubular bulbs include many sizes and styles of bulbs made for applications as varied as older incandescent exit signs and picture lamps. You may also see these in household appliances like vacuum cleaners and as replacement bulbs for microwave ovens.

Linear

Linear incandescents are one of two proprietary technologies made or licensed by GE for their Lumiline brand and by Sylvania for their Linestra brand. Though rare now, these were once a high-CRI, warm-toned alternative to fluorescent tubes.

Silver Bowl

Silver bowl bulbs are frequently used in restaurant pendant lights and other base-up fixtures. The reflective coating on the top of the bulb redirects light into a hanging fixture so that it is refracted by the fixture’s shade, reducing glare.

Control panel

A variety of bulbs in a control panel (Photo credit: Elsie esq.)

S6, S11, and S14 Indicator

S-type incandescent bulbs are found in everything from heavy machinery to instrument panels. S11 and S14 bulbs are widely used in signs, marquees, and flashing arrow sign boards you see in merging traffic as well as in amusement park rides, where they outline the profile of roller-coasters and bring a sparkle to Ferris wheels and merry-go-rounds.

C7 and C9 Commercial

C7 and C9 bulbs are well-known for their use in Christmas lights, though they have many commercial and specialty applications as well. Like S-type bulbs, C-type bulbs are often used in marquees and signs. In homes, C7 bulbs have especially widespread use in night lights.

Colored and Bug Lights

Though CFL and LED colored light bulbs are slowly gaining ground, colored incandescent bulbs are much more common. Colored light bulbs can be found in just about any bulb shape mentioned above. An especially popular subset of colored bulbs, the yellow bug light, is used on porches and decks as their yellow color blocks the wavelengths of light that attract moths and other irritating flying insects.

Code Beacon

Code beacon bulbs are high-wattage, high-output bulbs used on the roofs of buildings and in radio towers to signal aircraft.

Traffic Signal

As their name implies, these bulbs are used in old-fashioned traffic signals, though they have been all but replaced by Halogen and LED bulbs.

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Why Buy 130 Volt Light Bulbs?

May 25, 12 Why Buy 130 Volt Light Bulbs?

The following are excerpts from actual reviews on 1000Bulbs.com. What do they have in common? They’re all from reviews of 130 volt light bulbs.

“…even though the watt ratings are the same…the new ones aren’t as bright as the old ones.”

“The low output also makes the the color of the light very yellow…”

“…for 300 watts I thought it would be brighter.”

These customers, and several others, have a fundamental misunderstanding of 130 volt light bulbs. That’s not their fault, however; it’s ours. So let me try to clear up this issue once and for all.

As discussed briefly in an earlier article, the short, technical version goes like this: 130 volt Halogen and incandescent light bulbs are manufactured with a thick filament designed to withstand a theoretical 130 volts. I say “theoretical” because almost all homes in the US operate on only 110-120 volts. The thicker filament in a 130 volt bulb, when operated on typical 110-120 line voltage, provides less resistance to the electrical current flowing through the filament. As a result, the bulb burns cooler, uses less energy (watts), and lasts longer; however, as a trade-off, the bulb is also slightly dimmer and has a lower (more yellow) color temperature.

Understanding Voltage, Amps & Watts: “Hose Theory”

To understand this phenomenon, an analogy is useful. Think of a garden hose. When you turn on the tap to just a trickle, water flows freely through the hose without resistance. As you turn the tap more, you force a larger volume of water through the hose, which is met by a small amount of resistance from the hose. Now turn the tap to its highest setting. Instead of trickling from the end of the hose, water now sprays across your lawn and into the leather interior of your neighbor’s new convertible.

Because the hose is relatively small, it provides a lot of resistance to the more voluminous water flow, which causes pressure to build inside the hose. The increased pressure in the hose propels the water several feet instead of flowing with the mere trickle you saw when you had the tap at a lower setting. To take this concept further, imagine you continued to increase the volume of water flowing through the hose by attaching it to a fire hydrant (assuming such a thing was possible). At that point, the water pressure would become so intense it would weaken the hose, eventually causing it to rupture.

Maybe that’s a dramatic example, but the thin tungsten filament of a light bulb is not unlike a water hose. In the case of electricity, however, the volume of water is electrical current and the water pressure is voltage. With a 60 watt light bulb, for example, you are forcing 0.5 amp of electrical current (the “water”) through the filament (the “hose”) with 120 volts of pressure. The current meets the resistance of the filament, causing the filament to become hot and glow. Over time, just as with the water hose, this stress will cause the filament to break, making the bulb “burn out.”

130 Volt Bulbs Save Energy & Last Longer

To prolong the life of the bulb, you could lower the volume (amps) or the pressure (voltage). This is the approach taken by old rheostat dimmers.

Voltage Decrease & Bulb Efficiency

Voltage Decrease & Bulb Efficiency

However, you could also use a bulb with a thicker filament (a bigger hose), that places less resistance on the current so that it flows more easily. This method, as stated before, is the approach taken by the 130 volt bulb. Because the current moving through the thicker filament meets less resistance, it requires less energy to produce light. The more freely moving current also does not make the filament as hot so that the color temperature of  the light is also lower.

As the table to the right shows (from Jack L. Lindsey’s Applied Illumination Engineering), the trade-off is a very good one, too. A very small decrease in voltage and lumens leads to a huge increase in life and a considerable decrease in energy usage (watts). Lowering the voltage only 8%, for example, leads to a 300% increase in life and nearly 15% decrease in energy usage with only a 25% loss in light output!

Now back to the original question: Why buy 130 volt light bulbs? The answer is simple. Buy 130 volt bulbs when you want to save energy, change your bulbs less often, and don’t mind slightly lower light output and warmer color temperature.

 

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