Fluorescent Lights and Headaches

Oct 22, 14 Fluorescent Lights and Headaches

Thrashing pain meets you at the forefront of your temples, and suddenly it feels like someone has continually slammed your head against concrete. It’s a migraine and the culprit can sometimes be fluorescent lighting. But what can you do? Your office is filled with fluorescent lights and that old computer you use at home isn’t helping the situation. Luckily, there are solutions to your problem, but first, let’s figure out what’s really going on with that head of yours.

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Prevent Ice Dams by Switching Out Your Lights

Sep 29, 14 Prevent Ice Dams by Switching Out Your Lights

As we race through summer and into fall, it’s not a bad idea to prepare for the coming winter.  Last winter, many cities across the US saw substantial snowfall and freezing temperatures.  Doubtless, many of you also noticed the formation of ice dams on your roofs and in your rain gutters.  On their own, an ice dam isn’t damaging, but any degradation in your roof can lead to leaks and water damage inside your home.  It’s a shame since one way to prevent this is a simple replacement of your downlights.  Surprised?  Let’s take a look at ice dams and how your current lights might be the cause.

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Something Old, Something New, Something Lit, and Something Blue

Wedding Lighting with Color Splash

Wedding Lighting with Color Splash

June is quickly approaching; which means wedding season is upon us! Every girl dreams of the perfect wedding. Once the infamous question has been asked, the details of flowers, invitations, and napkins consume her mind. One minor detail that can make all the difference in the world is the lighting. Here are a few ideas to give your wedding lighting that extra sparkle.

Add a Splash of Color

While frantic about most things during wedding preparation, brides will always be sure of one thing, wedding colors. Why not enhance your wedding decor with colored bulbs? Whether you choose LED, halogen, or incandescent bulbs, adding a little touch of color to your wedding lighting will give your wedding originality. Place them in areas where you are looking for a colorful accent or back light.

Get Creative with Christmas Lights

What? Yes, use your Christmas light strings! Everyone has their Christmas light strings stored in their attic; get more use out of them! They may not seem like much, but they can make all the difference at your wedding. You can use them as an accent with tulle or line them along railings. Icicle light curtains are a stunning addition to wall decor, adding a distinguished ambiance with a simple elegance.

Charm with Candlelit Ambiance

The Uttermost cast iron and wood candelabra makes a beautiful, unique wedding centerpiece for reception tables. It has a rustic appeal with iron candle holders, finished in black, and a wooden base. Adorn it with white flowers or place a satin fabric around it to add a delicate touch to this stunning piece. For convenience, try battery operated LED candles with a flicker effect.

Dazzle with Twinkling Light Spheres

With a 12-foot lead wire, twinkling light spheres are a one-of-a-kind original! These intriguing light spheres come in a wide variety of colors and shapes, bringing a distinctive character to any festivity. The bulbs of the light spheres give off a stunning glitter effect, augmenting your wedding lighting. Hang them in a gazebo or off of trees, if you are outdoors, or over your reception tables, if you are indoors.

DIY Jar Lights

DIY Mason Jar

DIY Mason Jar

Jar lights make beautiful centerpieces for wedding reception tables. They are easy to make and add a simple, yet enchanting appeal to your wedding decor. Here’s what you need:

  • 0.5 gal. Mason Jar
  • Battery-Powered Light String
  • Rubber Band
  • Ribbon (color optional)
  • 3 8×8 in. Squares of Tulle (color optional)
  • Wire (optional)

Insert the light string into the jar. Place the tulle over the top of the jar and secure it with the rubber band. Tie the ribbon around the top of the jar to add ornamental detail. If you are interested in hanging it, wrap a thin wire around the top to create an arch; then tie the ribbon around it.

If you have any ideas you would like to share about wedding lighting, let us know in the comments section or send a message on Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus!

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Watts for Dessert? A Look at Edible Lighting Technologies

Everyone has heard the adage “my dog ate my homework.” Educators would say this is an excruciatingly poor excuse for not doing homework. However, “my dog ate my lamp, so I couldn’t do my homework” may soon become a legitimate excuse.

Thanks to some incredibly creative artists, the lighting world has a new addition, edible lamps. A sweet treat and good for the environment, these lamps definitely bring a new, distinctive quality to lighting.

Lumière au Chocolat

Lumière au Chocolat

Lumière au Chocolat

Delicious, scrumptious, and delectable, all words to define a lamp. What’s so tasty about a lamp? The idea that it is made of chocolate is a start. A Swedish designer by the name of Alexander Lervik worked with LED specialists from Saas Instruments to create the Lumière au Chocolat (Chocolate Lamp), which was on display at the Stockholm Furniture Fair. Influenced by the concept of polar nights, the lamp, as solid trapezoid of chocolate, is completely dark when turned on. As the heat from an incandescent bulb hits the chocolate, it starts to form holes, allowing more light to pass through. Once the chocolate thoroughly melts down, it slowly forms back into solid pieces for a delectable treat. Perhaps this lamp isn’t ideal for homework; it could be a wonderful addition to a restaurant’s dessert menu.

BITE ME

BITE ME LED desk lamp

BITE ME LED desk lamp

Not a chocolate fan? No worries! New York based designer Victor Vetterlein’s BITE ME bioplastic LED desk lamp is made from natural, non-toxic ingredients including agar (a gelatin formed from sea algae), flavoring, food coloring, purified water, and vegetable glycerin. Coming in flavors of apple, blueberry, orange, and cherry, this lamp resembles a fruit roll-up with the solidity of plastic. The lamp includes an LED circuit board with an adhesive strip to be placed on the underside of the lamp and two power cords, one to be connected to a low voltage power converter and the other to a USB port. Once the lamp becomes a terrible bore, toss it in your backyard as compost or eat it, of course. Simply wash the lamp with organic soap and warm water and soak it in water for an hour; it will soften and have the consistency and taste of a fruit snack.

Time to Eat

Roald Dahl would be proud; we’ve gotten a step closer to Willy Wonka’s “world of pure imagination.” While we haven’t quite gotten to the full-fledged chocolate waterfall or 3-course meal gum, we do have edible lamps. Interested in one of the two, or both? Unfortunately for all of us, these lamps are not currently for sale, but we’ll be standing in line next to you when they are.

What do you think about edible lamps? Leave us a comment or visit us on Facebook, Google Plus, or Twitter!

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Energy-Saving Light Bulbs (Video)

Today’s article takes a slightly different approach than usual. One of the questions we often get here on the blog and in our Wednesday Lighting Q&A on Facebook is about energy-saving bulbs. Specifically, people want to know what defines an energy-saving light bulb and what makes an LED better than a CFL, a CFL better than a Halogen, or any variant on that question.

With that in mind, we’ve recorded a short, introductory video that we hope will answer most of your questions. Of course, we’ll gladly answer any remaining questions you may have in the comments section below, on our Facebook page, or on our Twitter or Google Plus accounts. You can also check out our related Squidoo article, also titled “Energy-Saving Light Bulbs.”

So grab some popcorn and sit back! (Assuming that’s OK with your boss)

 

 

[TRANSCRIPT]

Welcome to 1000Bulbs.com, the Internet’s number one retailer of light bulbs and lighting products. In today’s video, we’ll be discussing a very popular but often misunderstood topic: Energy-saving light bulbs.

“Energy-saving” is a term thrown around pretty often these days, especially referring to light bulbs. But just what is an energy-saving light bulb? Though there is no strict definition of an energy-saving bulb, one thing is certain: It must be more efficient than an incandescent bulb. That said, energy-saving bulbs fall into one of three product types: Halogen light bulbs, compact fluorescents (more commonly known as “CFLs”), and light-emitting diodes, better known simply as “LEDs.” Let’s look at each bulb type one-by-one to understand their benefits.

First, for reference, we have incandescent light bulbs. Though they’re old technology, they’re still very common. On the plus side, incandescent light bulbs are inexpensive and completely dimmable. However, these attributes are overshadowed by how inefficient they are as well as their short lifespan.

Next, we have the first of our energy savers, the Halogen light bulb. You’ll notice that these look very similar to incandescent bulbs. Also like incandescent bulbs, Halogen bulbs are inexpensive and dimmable. However, Halogens only last about 1,000 hours, and they’re only 15 to 20 percent more efficient than incandescent bulbs.

Now we have the compact fluorescent, which is probably what you think of when you hear about energy-saving bulbs. CFLs have many positive attributes, including being relatively inexpensive, at least in comparison to LEDs, as well as lasting eight times longer than an incandescent or Halogen and using about 80% less energy than an incandescent bulb. Unfortunately, most compact fluorescents are non-dimmable. They also contain a small amount of toxic mercury, so they have to be recycled, and some people find their characteristic spiral shape off-putting.

Finally, we can discuss LED light bulbs. Not only are these the most efficient light bulbs available to homeowners, they last 50,000 hours or more, and most models are fully dimmable. Of course, anything has drawbacks, including LED. These bulbs are an emerging technology, so manufacturers are still working out some of their “kinks.” Also, as a new technology, LEDs are still relatively expensive, though their prices are dropping rapidly as technology improves.

So let’s look at these four bulbs side-by-side: An incandescent bulb produces 13.3 lumens–the standard measurement of light output–for each watt of energy used. A Halogen light bulb is only slightly more efficient, producing 16 lumens per watt. Compact fluorescents, however, make a huge leap in efficiency, producing 61.5 lumens per watt. But by far the most efficient is LED, which produces nearly 90 lumens per watt!

To learn more, be sure to visit 1000Bulbs.com!

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