Light Post Lighting News: New Fluorescent Technology, Rockefeller Tree, and More

Dec 10, 12 Light Post Lighting News: New Fluorescent Technology, Rockefeller Tree, and More

Here at 1000Bulbs.com, not only do we sell thousands of lighting products, lighting accessories,  and (my favorite) Christmas decorations to satisfy even the most seasoned lighting veteran, we also have our ears to the ground, scouring the Internet for news-worthy…news. Introducing Light Post, a bi-weekly gathering of lighting innovations and of course, news. So make sure you swing by every other week for your dose of Light Post.

Wake Forest Introduces Revolutionary Fluorescent Bulb

Physics professor David Carroll and his team of researchers at Wake Forest University have created a fluorescent bulb set to replace LEDs and standard fluorescents. These new bulbs, based on field-induced polymer electroluminescent (try saying that fives times in a row) technology, or FIPEL, are shatterproof, flicker-free, and won’t burn out. No more of the mosquito-in-your-ear humming noise many office workers complain about now. Besides no more humming, these lights give off a soft, white light and are extremely efficient, at least twice as efficient as compact fluorescent bulbs (CFL). Better yet, these lights are long-lasting: Carroll has one that has worked for about a decade. These lights should be available to consumers as early as next year.

Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree Lighting not Hampered by Hurricane Sandy

Hurricane Sandy definitely left a dark spot over New York City, flooding pretty much everything, costing millions of dollars, and leaving lots of people without power. However, the Rockefeller Christmas Tree Lighting erased any dark spot cast by the superstorm. The massive 80-foot Norway spruce, complete with 30,000 lights and topped with a Swarovski star, came to life November 28. The 10-ton tree resided at the Mount Olive, N.J. home of Joe Balku and was a mere 22-feet tall in 1973 when Balku bought the house. Today, the tree measures about 50 feet in diameter. The iconic tree will remain in the public eye until January 7.
After that, it will be turned into lumber for Habitat for Humanity.

Streetlights in Central London to be Controlled by iPads

If this isn’t evidence of technology becoming more and more important in our everyday lives, I don’t know what is. Westminster City Council announced it will be replacing about 14,000 central London street lights with new, iPad controlled smart lights. The iPad application will be able to monitor street lighting levels and reliability, monitor which lights are not working properly, and can even predict when a light will fail. Installation of the new lights will cost about $3 million, but it will save taxpayers hundreds of thousands a year.

Texas Towns and Parks Scale Back Lighting to See Stars

Having recently moved from a small, Texas town to the big city, I can certainly attest for the lack of star-gazing ability here in the Metroplex. That’s why many Texas towns and state parks are fighting light pollution. In recent years, Texas’ state parks have seen a decline in visitors and to lure them back, the parks are promoting chances for night-sky viewing, away from the city lights by advocating cities and towns to use down-facing light fixtures, so as not to pollute neighboring areas with unnecessary light.

LED Lights May Boost Milk Production in Cows

There may be a link between higher milk production and LED lights. An initial experiment done in 2010 at Oklahoma State University found a 6% increase in milk production in cows when traditional lights were replaced with LEDs, which consume at least 75% less energy than conventional incandescent bulbs, in areas where cows were housed. While the research is still underway, and if the results can be replicated in other institutions, not only will cows produce more milk, but the savings over the long run will be tremendous for farmers.

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New Product Enlightenment: LED Candelabra Bulb, Plantmax, and More

Dec 03, 12 New Product Enlightenment: LED Candelabra Bulb, Plantmax, and More

At 1000Bulbs.com, we know we have thousands of products. We also know that you have a life (outside of the Internet) and not a lot of time to go through every product we have online, so say hello to our new series, Enlightenment. Each week, we’ll feature our newest, most innovative products. Sit back, relax, and be enlightened.

PLT 3.5 Watt LED Candelabra Bulb

This energy saving decorative torpedo LED candelabra bulb is perfect for chandeliers and wall lighting and creates a perfect ambiance for any room. It can replace any 25 watt incandescent bulb and has a life expectancy of 30,000 hours. While the incandescent equal is less expensive, it has a life expectancy of only 1,500 hours (FYI, one of these LEDs is the equivalent of 20 incandescent bulbs). Start saving money and energy with our new 3.5 watt decorative torpedo LED candelabra bulb!

Quorum Fixtures

Looking for fun and unique light fixtures? Our newest products from Quorum International feature incredible fixtures with modern, geometric forms. These additions include bathroom fixtures, chandeliers, wall sconces, and more. They bring a stunning elegance with a clean and simple appearance. Give your home a contemporary look with these amazing Quorum International light fixtures!

LEDnovation EnhanceLite LED BR30

LEDnovation’s EnhanceLite LED BR30 is another new, and environmentally friendly, dimmable LED bulb. It is the perfect replacement for a 65 watt incandescent and has a life expectancy of 50,000 hours. It is also UL listed and RoHS compliant. This bulb can be used anywhere warm lighting is needed: Hotel, restaurant, or home – the choice is yours. Just one of these bulbs lasts as long as 25 incandescent bulbs. Be sure to view LEDnovation’s EnhanceLite LED BR30!

Plantmax Grow Lights

Harsh winters keeping you from your horticulture? Not anymore with our Plantmax grow lights! The new collection of Plantmax products includes metal halide bulbs, high pressure sodium bulbs, and ballasts. The metal halide bulbs help the plants grow in vegetative stages, while the high pressure sodium bulbs help in flowering and fruiting. Make sure you and your plants stay happy this winter. Take some time to browse Plantmax grow lights and see which ones are right for you!

eReplacements Projector Lamps

Our new ER series eReplacement front and rear projection lamps are compatible with different brands including 3M, Acer, Mitsubishi, Panasonic, RCA, Samsung, Sony, Toshiba, and many more. All of the lamps have a lifetime of 2,000 hours and a 3 month warranty. Browse through our eReplacement Projector Lamps and find the one best suited to your needs!

7-Gauge RAB Poles

Two of our new RAB 7-gauge drilled steel poles feature a tenon top, while the other has a square cap for pole top. They are all bronze, have a 4-inch shaft, and include an anchor bolt kit with a hand hole cover and a base cover. When used to hold pulse start metal halide flood light fixtures, they’re a great way to keep any large outdoor area lit. Browse through our collection of RAB mounting accessories today!

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Follow 1000Bulbs.com on YouTube

Oct 26, 12 Follow 1000Bulbs.com on YouTube

With nearly 100,000 views, you’ve made the 1000Bulbs.com YouTube channel one of the most popular lighting resources on the web! If you haven’t checked it out recently, here’s what you’re missing:

Product Information Videos

If you’re a fan of 1000Bulbs.com, you’ve noticed we always include any information our manufacturers provide about their product. From instructional guides to specification sheets and brochures, whatever you need is right there on the product page. The same goes for videos like this one from Plumen, which we make sure to include on both our website and our YouTube channel.

Product Tutorials

Have you found a cool product on our site but aren’t sure how to use it? Videos like the one on the Magic Box Christmas Light Tester show you how to use every feature of our product before you buy it!

DIY Videos

In previous articles explaining how to build an antique pendant lamp and last week’s how to build a lighted Halloween ghost, you may have also noticed our videos. There are more where those came from, so make sure to subscribe to our channel and check out our DIY projects page.

Customer Videos

One of the most popular videos on our channel was submitted by a customer. Robert Darwin’s video on how to make a Deadmau5 head using our acrylic globes now has nearly 8,000 views. We’d love to see your videos too, so if you have a video of something you’ve created with our products, let us know!

Be sure to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and Pinterest for even more video updates.

 

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Mercury in CFL Bulbs: Is It Dangerous?

Aug 31, 12 Mercury in CFL Bulbs: Is It Dangerous?

Lighting topics don’t get much more exciting than the debate over the mercury content of compact fluorescents (CFLs). Those against the use of CFLs claim that the potential harm of toxic mercury contained within the energy-saving bulbs far outweighs any environmental benefits. On the other side, groups feel such rhetoric is overblown. But what are the facts?

 

Why Use Mercury in CFLs?

Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element used in applications as varied as thermometers, dental fillings, and fluorescent lighting. The cathodes within a fluorescent tube produce electric current that passes through argon gas and mercury vapor. In turn, the mercury vapor emits ultraviolet light that excites the phosphor coating within the fluorescent tube, producing visible light [1]. The technology is the same for both linear fluorescent tubes (like those seen in office buildings) and self-ballasted compact fluorescents (the “spiral” bulbs used in homes). In short, without mercury, fluorescent lights will not work.

 

How Much Mercury is in a CFL?

The amount of mercury contained within a CFL varies, and in general, has decreased since their introduction nearly two decades ago. As of November 2010, the US EPA’s Energy Star program concluded that the average amount of mercury within a screw-in CFL was 4 milligrams, comparable to the size of a ballpoint pen tip [2]. This pales in comparison to older thermometers, which contain as much as 500 mg [3] and even amalgam dental fillings, which contain about 100 mg of mercury [4].

Mercury Content

Mercury Content in Popular Items

Keep in mind, however, that the mercury contained in a CFL, thermometer, or dental filling can be present in these sources in two forms: A liquid, which is what we typically think of when we think of mercury, and a vapor that quickly dissipates. In the case of a broken CFL, the most likely form of exposure comes from inhaled mercury vapor. A paper in the August 2009 issue of the lighting journal LD+A found that the median amount of mercury vapor to which a person is exposed through a broken CFL is a tiny fraction of the total mercury contained within the bulb: Approximately 0.07 micrograms (0.0007 mg). On the other hand, a tuna fish sandwich, which contains the more hazardous methylmercury, is estimated to expose the consumer to more than 48 times that amount due to the more efficient method of consumption (literally eating the mercury) [5].

 

Who Regulates Mercury in CFLs?

Despite its relatively low concentration in CFLs, mercury is still a toxic substance. For this reason, the EPA requires that CFLs contain no more than 5 mg of mercury for consideration in their Energy Star program. The European Union and the State of California adopted even tougher regulations, requiring CFLs to contain no more than 2.5 mg of mercury by 2013 [6]. Manufacturers, however, have made the biggest strides. A 60-watt equal, warm white Neolite CFL by Litetronics, for example, uses only 1 mg of mercury, 80% less than Energy Star requirements [7]. Along with other major manufacturers, Sylvania voluntarily capped CFL mercury content at 4 mg, with the 13-watt DULUX EL 29409 containing only 1.5 mg [8].

 

The Answer?

So the question remains: Is the mercury in CFLs dangerous? It’s not an easy question to answer. Mercury is a toxic substance, yet it is unlikely that fluorescent lighting would ever expose a person to an amount of the neurotoxin sufficient to cause physiological harm. Want proof of that? Despite putting themselves in a worst-case scenario fluorescent lighting mishap, to the best of our knowledge, these two guys are still alive and well:

 

References:

1. Van Dussen, Matthew. ‘The Mercury Myth: How Much Mercury Do CFLs Actually Contain?’ TXNOLOGIST. Retrieved 2012-08-30.

2. ‘Frequently Asked Questions: Information on Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs (CFLs) and Mercury’. Energy Star. Retrieved 2012-08-30.

3. ‘Indoor Liquid Mercury Spills: Frequently Asked Questions’. State of Michigan. Retrieved 2012-08-30.

4. ‘IMERC Fact Sheet: Mercury Use in Dental Amalgam’. NEWMOA. Retrieved 2012-08-30.

5. Clear, Robert et al. ‘Dangerous Mercury in CFLs? One Big Fish Story’. LD+A. Retrieved 2012-08-30.

6. (2)

7. Litetronics Neolite Sell Sheet. 1000Bulbs.com. Retrieved 2012-08-30.

8. ‘Mercury Quantity in Lamps for General Lighting Applications’. Sylvania. Retrieved 2012-08-30.

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Form and Function Meet in the Plumen CFL

Jul 27, 12 Form and Function Meet in the Plumen CFL

Many people in lighting and design circles are already familiar with the Plumen CFL. If you’re not, Plumen’s tagline sums it up pretty well: “The world’s first designer energy saving light bulb.”

To many, the typical spiral shape of a compact fluorescent is an eyesore, so they hide it under a lampshade or within an enclosed light fixture. That’s unfortunate, because there’s no reason a CFL has to be so ugly. In fact, the bulb’s glass tube can take virtually any form. There are plenty of fixtures, from pendants to desk lamps, which challenge the status quo. Why shouldn’t a bulb do the same?

Plumen Box

Plumen Packaging

The creators of the Plumen—designer Samuel Wilkinson and British design company Hulger—took that challenge. Their revolutionary bulb takes its inspiration from bird feathers (the “plume” in Plumen). Instead of twisting the glass tubes of the bulb into a utilitarian and industrial shape, the designers gave them an airy, organic form.  The unique design has already landed Plumen in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) and earned it the Brit Insurance Design of the Year Award.

Popular applications for the Plumen include pendant lights, floor lamps, and anywhere you might use an antique light bulb. Indeed, many stylish, yet energy conscious customers find the Plumen satisfies their desire for much less efficient incandescent antique bulbs. The Plumen uses only 11 watts to produce the equivalent light output of a 60 watt incandescent light bulb. This means the bulb saves 80% on your energy bills. In addition, the 8,000 hour bulb will outlast 8 to 10 incandescent bulbs. Lower bills, fewer carbon emissions, long life, and beautiful design: What more could you ask for in a light bulb?

Head over to our website to check out the Plumen, and let us know what you think. Drop us a line in the comments below or join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter, or Google+!

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