What is Light Pollution?

Jul 30, 14 What is Light Pollution?

For many people, it would be difficult to imagine living in a world where artificial light does not exist. Since the invention of light bulbs in 1879, the use of artificial light sources in everything from street lamps to table lamps has become a major part of the way we live our lives. While man-made light serves many important purposes, specifically in regards to public safety and technological advances, excessive and improper use of it has led to light pollution. The negative consequences of light pollution are many, but there are ways they can be prevented.

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10 LED Lighting Terms: Explained

Jul 21, 14 10 LED Lighting Terms: Explained

We’ve covered standard lighting terms before, but LEDs have a set of terms of their own.  The barrage of foreign jargon and acronyms on LED data sheets can leave a lot of people floundering between numbers and flashy buzz-words they aren’t used to.  So here’s a short list of 10 important industry terms and what they mean to help you make a more informed decision when you’re picking out your next LED light bulb.

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Color Temperature: Revisited

Jun 06, 14 Color Temperature: Revisited

Have you ever purchased a new light bulb expecting the same warm, yellow light as the bulb you replaced, only to end up with a much brighter, whiter light instead? Chances are you neglected to consider the bulb’s color temperature before making your purchase. Nothing turns people off from making the switch to LED or fluorescent lamps like accidentally selecting a bulb in the wrong hue, so we figure it’s about time for us to revisit this topic in a new light.

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An Explanation of CRI

Mar 28, 14 An Explanation of CRI

When you’re shopping for light bulbs, what are some of things you look for? The number of watts the bulb consumes? The initial lumen output? Most certainly the life hours, right? Well it’s time to add another one to the list: CRI. Never heard of it? Don’t fret; we’ll break it down for you!

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CFLs vs. LEDs: How Are They Different?

Mar 17, 14 CFLs vs. LEDs: How Are They Different?

Now that household incandescent bulbs are slowly but surely becoming a thing of the past due to government efficiency standards, many people are being pointed in the direction of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and LEDs as replacements. But you may not know what makes these two incandescent alternatives different from one another, beyond their appearance and pricing. When it comes to CFLs and LEDs, there have a lot more differences than what meets the eye.

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10 Lighting Terms You Should Know

Jun 07, 13 10 Lighting Terms You Should Know

Let’s face it: light bulbs can be confusing. Knowing which bulb you need is hard enough, let alone trying to understand all this jargon being thrown around by the lighting industry.  Below is a list of 10 commonly used lighting terms that will have you talking like a pro in no time.

Lumens (initial): While the amount of light a bulb produces is measured in lumens, the amount of light a bulb emits at the beginning of its life is referred to as initial lumens. Of course, the higher the initial lumens of a bulb, the brighter that bulb is going to be.

Lumens (mean): The term mean lumens is the amount of lumens the bulb produces at 50 percent of its life.

Volts: Think of volts, sometimes referred to as voltage, as a measure of electrical potential. Voltage is what pushes electrical current through a conductor. Typically, residences are wired for 110-130 volts, with businesses being wired anywhere from 220-277 volts. Most of your household bulbs operate at 120 volts.

Watts: This is probably one of the terms you hear the most. Watts (also referred to as wattage) refers to power consumption and the rate at which energy is drawn from an electrical system. The higher the wattage of the lamp, the more electricity that lamp will consume, and the higher your electricity bill.

Efficacy: Efficacy is the measure of lumen output per unit of power, and is measured in lumens per watt, expressed as “13 lumens per watt”. The higher the lumens per watt, the brighter the bulb, equaling a higher efficacy.

Color Temperature: Despite its name, color temperature actually has nothing to do with physical temperature. It refers to the color of the light produced by the lamp, measured in degrees Kelvin. A simple rule of thumb for remembering color temperature is this: the lower the temperature, the yellower the light, and the higher the temperature, the whiter the light. For example, a 2700K bulb has a warm color to it, perfect for living rooms or dining rooms. A 5000K bulb has a very white color to it, often referred to as “natural white” or “stark white,” and is ideal for office buildings, doctors’ offices, and in department stores.

Beam Angle: The name is a dead giveaway. Beam angle is simply the angle of the beam of light produced by the bulb. Beam angle is a key factor typically associated with bulbs such as MRs or PARs, which are generally used for things like track lighting or recessed lighting and is measured in two ways, either with actual degree measurements or with a series of designations. The degree measurements range anywhere from 7 degrees to more than 160 degrees, while the designations run from very narrow spot, spot, narrow flood, flood, wide flood, and very wide flood.

Center Beam Candlepower: Center beam candlepower, sometimes abbreviated as CB Candlepower, is the measure of the intensity of light produced at the center of a lamp beam, which is measured in candelas.

Life hours: This is exactly what the name suggests. Life hours are the number of hours the bulb can be expected to operate. For most lamps, life hours are calculated by observing when 50% of a group of lamps fail.

CRI: A bulb’s CRI, or color rendering index, is the measurement a light source has on colors and surfaces. Bulbs with a high CRI (80 and above) make colors appear more vibrant and natural, while bulbs with a low CRI (79 and below) will make colors look washed out and even take on a different hue.

Are there any other lighting terms you can think of? Let us know in the comments below, or on Facebook, Twitter, or Google Plus!

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